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COVID-19 Risk Level for Multnomah County: High Risk

Services and Information for Water, stormwater, and sewer

Use a discount calculator to see how your savings will increase with each step you take to let stormwater runoff from your roof, driveway, or parking lot safely soak into the ground on your property.
Pay and manage your options on your City of Portland sewer, stormwater, and water bill. During the COVID-19 emergency, we are not charging late fees and will not disconnect water due to payment issues. Customers are still responsible for charges accrued during this time.
The 2020 Source Control Manual became effective Dec. 14. The manual sets City policy for drainage and discharges resulting from development and post-development activities for site-specific activities like waste storage, loading and unloading, exterior storage and processing, and dewatering.
The 2020 Stormwater Management Manual became effective Dec.14. The manual sets City policy and design requirements for stormwater management on all development, redevelopment, and improvement projects on both public and private property in Portland.
The Downtown-Old Town Sewer Repair Program is a multi-year and multi-million-dollar investment to assess the condition and capacity of the aging public sewer system serving Portland's Downtown and Old Town neighborhoods and to construct the necessary repairs and upgrades.
You can apply for a permit to use water from hydrants. We offer annual hydrant permits and temporary hydrant permits. Read on for information about each type of permit.
Every second of the day, more than 2,250 miles of pipe deliver water throughout the Portland area. If you stretched those pipes end to end, you'd have to drive to Mexico City to catch a drop. How does it all work? Start here for the basics on the visible and invisible parts of our water system.
STEP is the largest improvement project at the treatment plant since the 1970s. The improvements will increase the plant's resiliency, protect water quality, and provide healthier work environments for essential workers.
Environmental Services' Secondary Treatment Expansion Program is the first City project with a project-specific Community Benefits Agreement (CBA). The agreement is one of the City's strategies to diversify the construction industry.
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We serve excellent water every minute of every day.
We offer flexible loans for eligible properties to perform environmental cleanup. Nonprofit organizations may be able to access these funds as grants.
We offer financial assistance for eligible properties to receive environmental site assessment reports. Projects must demonstrate financial need and community benefit. Please give us a call to find out if your project is eligible. Applications are accepted on a rolling basis.
If you have a project that benefits your community and the environment, you can apply for a Community Watershed Stewardship Program (CWSP) grant of up to $12,000. The two-page pre-application for projects is due by 4 p.m. on the first Friday of February each year.