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COVID-19 Safety, Recovery and Resilience

Face coverings are required in indoor public spaces and many outdoor spaces. State policy
Access City programs, people and projects helping Portland recover. Portland United

Volunteer. Play. Stay. Shop. Show the Rose City a little love. Here for Portland

Services and Resources for Water, stormwater, and sewer

Use a discount calculator to see how your savings will increase with each step you take to let rain running off your roof, driveway, or parking lot safely soak into the ground on your property.
Pay and manage your options on your City of Portland sewer, stormwater, and water bill.

During the COVID-19 emergency, we are not charging late fees and will not disconnect water due to payment issues. Customers are still responsible for charges accrued during this time.
Leaks not only put stress on the drinking water system, but also send clean water to the wastewater treatment plant. Reduce your impact on the environment and save money and water by repairing some leaks yourself! Follow these easy steps to fix a leaky faucet.
The 2020 Source Control Manual became effective Dec. 14. The manual sets City policy for drainage and discharges resulting from development and post-development activities for site-specific activities like waste storage, loading and unloading, exterior storage and processing, and dewatering.
The 2020 Stormwater Management Manual (SWMM) became effective Dec.14. The manual sets City policy and design requirements for stormwater management on all development, redevelopment, and improvement projects on both public and private property in Portland.
This annual report contains important information about Portland's drinking water and water system.
此年度报告含有关 Portland(波特兰)饮用水及供水系统的重要信息。
Combined sewer overflows to the Willamette River and Columbia Slough are rare. But when they do occur, Portlanders are advised to stay out of the water for 48 hours following a CSO due to higher levels of bacteria and other contaminants. Find out if a CSO is happening now.
The Downtown-Old Town Sewer Repair Program is a multi-year and multi-million-dollar investment to assess the condition and capacity of the aging public sewer system serving Portland's Downtown and Old Town neighborhoods and to construct the necessary repairs and upgrades.

About Green Streets

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Green streets reduce sewer overflows and backups by slowing and absorbing stormwater runoff from sidewalks and streets. Also known as rain gardens or bioswales, green streets are important to the City’s sewer and stormwater systems. They also help prevent pollution from washing into our rivers.
You can apply for a permit to use water from hydrants. We offer annual hydrant permits and temporary hydrant permits. Read on for information about each type of permit.
The Percent for Green grant program is open to community groups who would like to complete large-scale green infrastructure projects that provide broad benefits for watershed health and the community. Grants range from $20,000 to $100,000. Projects usually take about two years to complete.
Every second of the day, more than 2,250 miles of pipe deliver water throughout the Portland area. If you stretched those pipes end to end, you'd have to drive to Mexico City to catch a drop. How does it all work? Start here for the basics on the visible and invisible parts of our water system.
Spanning 20 years at a ratepayer investment of $1.4 billion, the Big Pipe Project has reduced combined sewer overflows to the Willamette River by 94 percent and to the Columbia Slough by 99 percent. With most overflows eliminated, the Willamette is cleaner than it’s been in decades.
The Portland Water Bureau is planning a new drinking water Filtration Facility and Pipelines to comply with state and federal safe drinking water regulations. These lasting improvements to the Bull Run water system will help keep our water safe and abundant for generations to come.
Located less than thirty miles east of Portland, the Bull Run Watershed's unique geography and rich history make it an iconic part of the story of our region. It serves as the primary drinking water supply for nearly one million people in the Portland metro area.
In service since 1992, the Columbia Boulevard Wastewater Treatment Plant’s Community Advisory Committee provides important input to Environmental Services on projects, construction, and operations and maintenance at the plant.