Small Capital Programs

Information
Small Capital Programs fill gaps in the multi-modal transportation system through small projects that help people cross streets safely, speed up transit, improve neighborhood greenways and bicycle facilities, reduce crashes for all road users, and increase access to places Portlanders want to go.

Programs Overview

Quick Build projects fill in gaps in the transportation system

The 2035 Transportation System Plan identifies 10 citywide program that contribute to a multimodal transportation system that is safe and provides options to get Portlanders where they want to go. Each program works to fill gaps and deficiencies in the transportation network through the construction small capital projects, known as "Quick Build" projects. While these projects are small in geographic scale, and generally are under $500,000, they can have a big impact on how people safely get to where they need to go. Funding for the projects comes from general transportation revenues, the cannabis tax, partnerships with other city bureaus and jurisdictions, and grants.  

Programs Descriptions

Pedestrian Network CompletionGaps and deficiencies in Portland's pedestrian network present significant barriers to pedestrians. Many of these can be remedied through modest expenditures to address the most critically needed improvements. These projects should contribute to an increase in safe walking as disincentives to usage are eliminated and the continuity of the pedestrian network is improved. Example projects include sidewalk gap infill, sidewalk improvements, safer shoulders, shared streets, pathways, trails, crossing improvements, wayfinding improvements, accessibility improvements, and signal modifications. The program will also work to identify and implement needed improvements in designated Pedestrian Districts.
Bikeway Network CompletionGaps and deficiencies in Portland's bikeway network present significant barriers to bicyclists. Many of these can be remedied through modest expenditures to address the most critically needed improvements. These projects should contribute to an increase in safe bicycling as disincentives to usage are eliminated and the continuity of the bikeway network is improved. Example projects include new bike lanes and sharrows, improvements to existing bikeways, wayfinding improvements, colored bike boxes and lanes, and signal modifications. This program will coordinate with paving projects to ensure that new striping designs are developed ahead of time and implemented in conjunction with paving. The program will also work to identify and implement needed improvements in designated Bicycle Districts.
Neighborhood GreenwaysThe Neighborhood Greenway system provides a network of safe and comfortable pedestrian/bicycle priority routes on low-volume, low-speed streets. The Neighborhood Greenway network will be improved and expanded over time through inexpensive treatments that lower speeds, reduce automobile volumes, create safer crossings of busy streets, and provide wayfinding. Example project elements include speed bumps, sharrows, signage, diverters, curb ramps, lighting, and improved crossings.
Vision ZeroHigh Crash Corridors are streets in Portland with a high concentration of crashes. The High Crash Corridor program uses relatively inexpensive education, enforcement and engineering solutions to address crash problems in a short period of time. Example projects include improved crossings, lane reorganizations, curb extensions, median islands, speed reader boards, and speed/crosswalk enforcement.
Safe Routes to SchoolPortland Safe Routes to School is a partnership of the City of Portland, schools, neighborhoods, community organizations and agencies that advocates for and implements programs that make walking and biking around our neighborhoods and schools fun, easy, safe and healthy for all students and families while reducing our reliance on cars. The Portland Safe Routes to School program currently provides Education, Encouragement, Engineering, Enforcement, and Evaluation in an Equitable manner (6 ‘E's) to support students in schools to be safe, have fun, grow healthy and get there.
Transit PriorityImprove transit speed, reliability, safety, and access along major transit corridors. Example projects include sidewalk infill, crossing improvements, stop improvements, stop consolidation or relocation, signal priority, queue jumps, and transit-only lanes. The program will coordinate with TriMet and other transit agencies to identify and implement these improvements.
Freight PriorityImprove freight speed, reliability, safety, and access along major freight routes. Example projects include signal priority, freight-only lanes, queue jumps, loading zones, and turning radius improvements. The program will coordinate with the Port of Portland and other freight-related organizations to identify and implement these improvements.
Transportation & Parking Demand ManagementTransportation & Parking Demand Management (TDM) seeks to better utilize existing capacity in the transportation system and parking supply by reducing single-occupant automobile trips through demand management strategies. This is achieved by encouraging people through education, outreach, incentives and pricing to choose other modes, share rides, travel outside peak times, and telecommute, among other methods. TDM program elements include SmartTrips outreach, TDM Plan requirements for new development, and parking management planning and implementation.   TDM is often implemented in partnerships with community organizations, neighborhood and business associations, developers and property managers.
Transportation System ManagementTransportation System Management (TSM) seeks to identify improvements to enhance the capacity of existing system through operational improvements.  Through better management and operation of existing transportation facilities, these techniques are designed to improve traffic flow, air quality, and movement of vehicles and goods, as well as enhance system accessibility and safety. Example projects include corridor signal timing, electronic message boards, variable speed limits, traveler information services, traffic cameras, bluetooth readers, and other intelligent transportation system (ITS) elements.
Alternative Street DesignBuild local streets to the City’s Shared Street standard. Projects will include stormwater management, paving dirt and gravel streets to accommodate pedestrians, cyclists, and motor vehicles.

Where projects come from

Each program maintains a reference list of projects that are eligible for funding. Reference lists are drawn from adopted plans such as PedPDX, Safe Routes to Schools Strategic Plan, Neighborhood Greenway Assessment Report, Vision Zero Action Plan and the 2030 Bicycle Master Plan, as well as area plans such as Southwest in Motion,Northwest in Motion, and East Portland in Motion

Projects also are identified by community members who report issues through the 823-SAFE program. Projects from the program reference lists are selected for funding based on a number of evaluation criteria including equity, safety, asset management, climate, and the opportunity to leverage other projects such as repaving of streets.   

Current Projects

The following list shows projects funded with "Quick Build" funding that have been completed or are currently in progress, subject to feasibility. These projects represent a subsection of the overall small capital projects.

(as of September 2021)

Future Projects

Each small capital program maintains a reference list of projects that may be eligible for future funding. This list is illustrative and these projects are not currently funded. Projects may change as they are further developed and scoped.

As of September 2021: