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Transportation System Development Charges

Are you applying for, or planning to apply for, a building permit (or any other City approval) for development in the City of Portland? If the answer is yes, the information about Transportation System Development Charges (TSDCs) and the City's development review process will be of interest to you.

On this page

Citywide TSDC Projects

How development in Portland helps build our transportation system

Whenever a new building is constructed in Portland, including a home, store, office, etc., the developer pays Transportation System Development Charges, or TSDCs. These are one-time fees paid by developers when they build something new. The fee covers part of the cost of building transportation facilities to serve development—things like roads, sidewalks and other facilities that get people to where they need to go. TSDCs also apply to redevelopment of existing buildings when that redevelopment will generate an increase in trips to and from the site.

What do the fees pay for?

The fees pay for specific projects that are on the TSDC project list. In fact, funds collected through the TSDC program can only be used to pay for projects that are on the TSDC project list. This list is updated every 10 years with input from the public. It includes a subset of projects from the larger Transportation System Plan (TSP) and other adopted City plans. Prior to the 2017 update, the TSDC project list was last updated in 2007.

Each project on the list that is prioritized for funding is expected to use a combination of TSDC funds plus other funding—from grants or other sources. TSDCs are just one tool that helps pay to construct Portland’s transportation system—along with federal and state grants, gas tax revenues, and other sources. On average, TSDC funds are expected to represent about 30% of total project costs, even if the legal eligibility is a higher percentage.

Recent projects that were built using TSDC fees include:

  • New sidewalks along SE 136th Avenue
  • Parts of the light rail and streetcar system
  • Improvements to NE Cully Boulevard that enhanced pedestrian and bike safety
  • A new neighborhood greenway connecting NE and SE Portland in the 50’s (for example, 52nd Avenue)
  • SW Moody Avenue multi-modal improvements

If you're curious about the cost of your fees, use the fee estimator.

How do projects make it onto the TSDC project list?

A graphic to describe what makes a TSDC project eligible for the list

The current TSDC project list will fund projects between 2017 and 2027. It was developed by first looking at the TSP project list, and projects in other recently adopted plans or studies, and identifying those projects oriented toward accommodating development growth and improving travel. (By law, TSDC funds can only be used to fund construction of projects that add to the capacity of people to get around. They can’t be used on things like transportation studies or maintenance.)

City staff engaged with the public, stakeholders and technical staff to take that narrowed-down list of projects from the TSP list and further refine it to include a broad mix of projects that:

  • Benefit all parts of the city
  • Meet needs of our diverse communities and reflect projects that Portlanders actually want
  • Improve travel by all modes: driving, walking, biking, taking mass transit, freight and wheelchair
  • Have grants or other financial support

What projects are on the TSDC project list?

A graphic to describe eligible versus not eligible TSDC projects

Projects on the TSDC project list are just a small subset of projects being built or planned for in Portland. Since TSDC revenues can only fund projects that “add capacity” to the transportation system, it doesn’t include things like preventative maintenance, fixing potholes, minor operational changes, etc. It also doesn’t include larger regional and state roadway or major transit projects funded through other sources, unless there is an expected local match from Portland.

See below for a full list of projects:

TSDC Overlays Projects and Rate Studies

With extensive public input, the City has identified a list of growth-oriented, multi-modal transportation improvement projects that will guide the spending of TSDC revenues over the next 10 to 20 years. 

The rate studies indicate projects to be constructed with TSDC revenues.  About one-quarter of the projects’ costs, representing that portion of new capacity projects that will serve new transportation trips, will be paid with TSDC revenues.  The remainder of project costs will be paid with other revenues, in part because a portion of needed investments address existing transportation needs (and TSDCs cannot be used for those). 

If the City does not collect as much money as anticipated, some projects will not be built or the City Council may choose to update and renew the project lists.  The City will ultimately determine which projects to fund as part of its annual Capital Improvement Plan process.  TSDC revenue can only be used for new capacity improvements.

North Macadam

North Macadam now has a Transportation System Development Charge (TSDC) “Overlay” that development in the North Macadam Urban Renewal Area will pay in addition to the Citywide TSDC. A TSDC Overlay is an additional TSDC that is charged only in and for a specific area, in this case the North Macadam Urban Renewal Area.

In 2009, the City adopted the TSDC Overlay for development in the North Macadam area. The TSDC Overlay is based on the cost of specific projects that benefit the Overlay zone. See the TSDC Overlay eligible projects list and map.

The TSDC Overlay fees will be collected and expended on capacity-increasing projects to serve future users within the boundaries of the Overlay zone. The TSDC Overlay is a funding tool, designed to collect local dollars to leverage other federal, state, and local dollars to fully fund these multi-modal transportation improvement projects.

If you must pay the Citywide TSDCs and your development is in the North Macadam urban renewal area you must pay both TSDCs: Citywide and the North Macadam Overlay TSDC.

If your development is outside the North Macadam area you pay only the Citywide TSDCs and do not pay the North Macadam Overlay TSDC. You can make a single payment for both TSDCs. The City will deposit the Citywide portion to the Citywide TSDC account, and the North Macadam portion to a separate account for the North Macadam Overlay.

Exemptions are the same as the Citywide TSDC.

Eligible Projects for North Macadam TSDC Overlay Investment: 2008-2028

Project NameTotal CostEligible TSDC Cost
SW Harbor Drive & River Parkway Intersection Improvements$5,662,258$1,693,629
South Portal, Phase I$28,053,358$7,177,421
Moody/Bond Street Improvement: East Leg Gibbs to Sheridan$11,759,693$4,586,427
South Light Rail$101,463,030$12,175,564
SW Kelly Way and Hood Avenue Ramp$38,272,128$7,617,492
North Portal: SW Corbett and Sheridan Street Improvements$9,256,116$2,729,431
TOTAL$194,466,529$35,979,964
 A map showing the North Macadam Urban Renewal Area

Innovation Quadrant

Innovation Quadrant now has a Transportation System Development Charge (TSDC) “Overlay” that development in the Innovation Quadrant will pay in addition to the Citywide TSDC. A TSDC Overlay is an additional TSDC that is charged only in and for a specific area, in this case the Innovation Quadrant. The Innovation Quadrant’s boundaries are shown on the map to the right.

In 2011, the City adopted the TSDC Overlay for development in the Innovation Quadrant. The TSDC is based on the cost of specific projects that benefit the Overlay zone. See the TSDC Overlay eligible projects list and map.

The TSDC Overlay fees will be collected and expended on capacity-increasing projects to serve future users within the boundaries of the Overlay zone. The TSDC Overlay is a funding tool, designed to collect local dollars to leverage other federal, state, and local dollars to fully fund these multi-modal transportation improvement projects.

If you must pay the Citywide TSDCs and your development is in the Innovation Quadrant you must pay both TSDCs: Citywide and the Innovation Quadrant Overlay TSDC. If your development is outside the Innovation Quadrant you pay only the Citywide TSDCs and do not pay the Innovation Quadrant Overlay TSDC.

You can make a single payment for both TSDCs. The City will deposit the Citywide portion to the Citywide TSDC account, and the Innovation Quadrant portion to a separate account for the Innovation Quadrant Overlay.

Exemptions are the same as the Citywide TSDC.

Eligible Projects for Innovation Quadrant TSDC Overlay Investment: 2011-2031

Project NameTotal CostEligible TSDC Cost
Portland-Milwaukie Light Rail$55,000,000$5,000,000
Close the Loop$22,518,465$5,425,243
SE Water Avenue Relocation$4,633,839$1,565,478
SW 4th Avenue Streetscape$2,402,138$1,301,088
Broadway Cycle Track and Streetscape$1,244,573$674,107
Clinton to the River Multi-Use Path$4,625,597$600,000
TOTAL$90,424,612$14,565,916
A map showing the Innovation Quadrant

Will all of the projects on the TSDC project list actually get built?

The TSDC project list represents the universe of projects that are legally eligible to receive TSDC funding. This list includes 169 total projects that would cost far more to build than the expected TSDC revenues could cover. It is not expected that all of the projects will be built over the next 10 years nor that any project would be fully funded by TSDCs. On average, TSDC funds are expected to represent about 30% of total project costs, even if the legal eligibility is a higher percentage. This approach provides the city flexibility to apply TSDC funds to leverage other funding sources – increasing the total number of projects built to serve trips generated by new development.

Projects will be prioritized for funding as part of PBOT’s investment strategy and annual capital improvement plan (CIP), beginning each September. The PBOT Budget Advisory Committee deliberates, reviews and approves the CIP.

A graphic to describe TSDC funding

How can I find out about projects in my neighborhood?

PBOT publishes a report every year to show how much TSDC revenue was collected, and the status of projects being built from those funds.

TSDC Rates

Citywide TSDC Rates: August 1, 2020 - June 30, 2021

Type of DevelopmentUnit of MeasureTSDC Per Unit
Residential
Single Family (1,200 square feet or more)dwelling$5,544.00
Single Family (1,199 square feet or less)dwelling$2,772.00
Multiple Familydwelling$2,728.00
Senior Housing / Assisted Living / Nursing Homedwelling/bed$1,406.00
Commercial - Services
Banksq   ft/GFA$40.51
Day Caresq   ft/GFA$7.41
Hotel / Motelroom$3,732.00
Service Station / Gasoline SalesVFP$33,294.00
Movie Theater / Event Hallsq   ft/GFA$13.98
Carwashwash stall$19,477.00
Health Club / Racquet Clubsq   ft/GFA$16.79
Commercial - Institutional
School, K-12sq   ft/GFA$5.43
University / College / Jr Collegestudent$633.00
Churchsq   ft/GFA$2.52
Hospitalsq   ft/GFA$4.46
Parkacre$506.00
Commercial - Restaurant
Restaurant (Standalone)sq   ft/GFA$31.58
Quick Service Restaurant (Drive-Through)sq   ft/GFA$99.43
Commercial - Retail
Shopping / Retailsq   ft/GFA$12.37
Convenience Marketsq   ft/GFA$97.82
Free Standing Retail Store / Supermarketsq   ft/GFA$25.33
Car Sales – New / Usedsq   ft/GFA$11.17
Commercial - Office
Administrative Officesq   ft/GFA$5.73
Medical Office / Clinicsq   ft/GFA$17.02
Industrial
Light Industrial / Manufacturingsq   ft/GFA$3.72
Warehousing / Storagesq   ft/GFA$1.06
Self-Storagesq   ft/GFA$1.06

North Macadam Overlay TSDC Rates: August 1, 2020 - June 30, 2021

Type of DevelopmentUnit of MeasureTSDC Per Unit
Residential
Single Family (1,200 square feet or more)dwelling$3,547.00
Single Family (1,199 square feet or less)dwelling$1,773.00
Multiple Familydwelling$1,745.00
Senior Housing / Assisted Living / Nursing Homedwelling/bed$900.00
Commercial - Services
Banksq   ft/GFA$25.92
Day Caresq   ft/GFA$4.74
Hotel / Motelroom$2,388.00
Service Station / Gasoline SalesVFP$21,300.00
Movie Theater / Event Hallsq   ft/GFA$8.94
Carwashwash stall$12,460.00
Health Club / Racquet Clubsq   ft/GFA$10.74
Commercial - Institutional
School, K-12sq   ft/GFA$3.47
University / College / Jr Collegestudent$405.00
Churchsq   ft/GFA$1.61
Hospitalsq   ft/GFA$2.85
Parkacre$324.00
Commercial - Restaurant
Restaurant (Standalone)sq   ft/GFA$20.20
Quick Service Restaurant (Drive-Through)sq   ft/GFA$63.61
Commercial - Retail
Shopping / Retailsq   ft/GFA$7.92
Convenience Marketsq   ft/GFA$62.58
Free Standing Retail Store / Supermarketsq   ft/GFA$16.20
Car Sales – New / Usedsq   ft/GFA$7.14
Commercial - Office
Administrative Officesq   ft/GFA$3.67
Medical Office / Clinicsq   ft/GFA$10.89
Industrial
Light Industrial / Manufacturingsq   ft/GFA$2.38
Warehousing / Storagesq   ft/GFA$0.68
Self-Storagesq   ft/GFA$0.68

Innovation Quadrant Overlay TSDC Rates: August 1, 2020 - June 30, 2021

Type of DevelopmentUnit of MeasureTSDC Per Unit
Residential
Single Family (1,200 square feet or more)dwelling$2,856.00
Single Family (1,199 square feet or less)dwelling$1,428.00
Multiple Familydwelling$1,406.00
Senior Housing / Assisted Living / Nursing Homedwelling/bed$724.00
Commercial - Services
Banksq   ft/GFA$20.87
Day Caresq   ft/GFA$3.82
Hotel / Motelroom$1,923.00
Service Station / Gasoline SalesVFP$17,152.00
Movie Theater / Event Hallsq   ft/GFA$7.20
Carwashwash stall$10,034.00
Health Club / Racquet Clubsq   ft/GFA$8.65
Commercial - Institutional
School, K-12sq   ft/GFA$2.79
University / College / Jr Collegestudent$326.00
Churchsq   ft/GFA$1.30
Hospitalsq   ft/GFA$2.30
Parkacre$261.00
Commercial - Restaurant
Restaurant (Standalone)sq   ft/GFA$16.27
Quick Service Restaurant (Drive-Through)sq   ft/GFA$51.22
Commercial - Retail
Shopping / Retailsq   ft/GFA$6.37
Convenience Marketsq   ft/GFA$50.39
Free Standing Retail Store / Supermarketsq   ft/GFA$13.05
Car Sales – New / Usedsq   ft/GFA$5.75
Commercial - Office
Administrative Officesq   ft/GFA$2.95
Medical Office / Clinicsq   ft/GFA$8.77
Industrial
Light Industrial / Manufacturingsq   ft/GFA$1.92
Warehousing / Storagesq   ft/GFA$0.55
Self-Storagesq   ft/GFA$0.55

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: What is a TSDC?
A: Whenever a new building is constructed in Portland, including a home, store, office, etc., the developer pays Transportation System Development Charges, or TSDCs. These are one-time fees paid by developers when they build something new. The fee covers part of the cost of building transportation facilities to serve development—things like roads, sidewalks and other facilities that get people to where they need to go. TSDCs also apply to redevelopment of existing buildings when that redevelopment will generate an increase in trips to and from the site

Q: What do the fees pay for?

A: The fees pay for specific projects that are on the TSDC project list.

Q: Who pays and what kind of development is included?
A: TSDC fees apply to all types of development—residential, commercial, and industrial. Developers pay TSDC fees when they receive a building permit from the City of Portland for a new development, or changes of use to existing buildings that will increase the number of person trips to and from the site.

Q: How much do developers pay?
A: The fees are based on how many person trips a new development will create during the evening commute hour. For example, a single family home will have much less impact than a large grocery store, so the fee is substantially less for a home than for a grocery store. The greater the impact a new development will have on our transportation system, the higher its rate. 

The City classifies developments into different land use categories. There are 27 land use categories—things like single family residential, multi-family residential, movie theaters, churches, hospitals, convenience stores, self-storage, etc.  Each of these uses pay a different rate based on the number of person trips they generate.

What are overlay zones (North Macadam and the Innovation Quadrant)?

A: In addition to the Citywide TSDC, developers may pay additional fees when they develop in specific “overlay” zones. A TSDC Overlay is an additional TSDC that is charged only in, and for, that specific zone. Currently there are two overlay zones in Portland: North Macadam and the Innovation Quadrant. Fees collected from developers who build in the overlay zones will be used on transportation projects to serve future users within the boundaries of the overlay zone. You can learn about TSDCs for the overlay zones on the TSDC Rates Page.

Q: Can developers do anything to pay a lower or different fee amount?
A: Yes. Developers can submit information showing that their development does not generate as many trips as shown in the City’s rate study. The TSDC program administrator has the ultimate decision whether or not to accept the data.  There are also certain credits and exemptions available in some instances.

Q: Are TSDC credits available and how are they determined?
A: If you participate in building a project that is on the TSDC list of capital projects, you may be entitled to a dollar-for-dollar credit against your current TSDC assessment.

Q: Can I give away or sell my TSDC credits?
A: A TSDC credit may only be used on the development site. TSDC credits may not be transferred to a different development site.

Q: Are TSDC exemptions available?
A: Exemptions from TSDC assessments are: permits that will have a negligible impact on the overall trip generation of a site (by increasing the total number of PM Peak Hour person trips generated by the site by less than 15% and fewer than 25 trips); permits for remodels that do not change the use of a building; and changes of use within an existing building, when the entire building is under 3,000 square feet.  Buildings between 3,001 and 5,000 square feet are assessed TSDCs on a graded scale.  For example, a 3,500-square-foot building would receive a 75 percent discount and a 4,500-square-foot building would receive a 25 percent discount.  Exemptions also are available for low-income housing projects that meet affordability criteria and timelines.

Q: What if I disagree with the amount of the TSDC my development is assessed?
A: You have two options:  1) you can submit information showing that your development does not generate as many PM peak hour person trips as shown in the City's rate study; or 2) you can appeal to the TSDC Administrator within 180 days of when your building permit was issued.

Q: When and how do I pay the TSDC?
A: The obligation to pay the TSDC is established when your building permit is issued.  You have three options to pay:  1) at the time the permit is issued; 2) in one payment, six, nine, or twelve months of the date of permit issuance with interest (deferral term based on project valuation); or 3) in monthly installments, with interest, over a period of five, 10 or 20 years. You will be required to make an irrevocable commitment to a payment option before the permit will be issued.  Whether you choose to defer payments or finance the TSDC over time, the City will file a priority lien against the subject property. There is a service charge for establishing the lien account.

Q: Where can I find the TSDC rate that applies to my development?  Who ultimately determines my total TSDC cost?
A: See the rate charts above. The Portland Bureau of Transportation is responsible for determining the cost. If your type of development does not appear in the chart, contact Richard Eisenhauer at (503) 823-6108 or  or David Nassif (503) 823-5586 for more information regarding the TSDC.

Forms

Resources

Administrative Procedures Guide

Transportation System Development Charge administrative rules

City Code 17.15

Transportation System Development Charge code

Annual Reports

TSDC Definitions of Terms

Definitions of Important Terms

Gross Floor Area (GFA):  The sum (in square feet) of the area of each floor level in the building, including cellars, basements, mezzanines, penthouses, corridors, lobbies, stores and offices, that are within the principal outside faces of exterior walls, not including architectural setbacks or projections. Included are all areas that have floor surfaces with clear standing head room (6 feet, 6 inches minimum) regardless of their use.  If a ground-level area, or part thereof, within the principal outside faces of the exterior walls is not enclosed, this GFA is considered part of the overall square footage of the building.  However, unroofed areas and unenclosed roofed-over spaces, except those contained within the principle outside faces of exterior walls, should be excluded from the area calculations.  For purposes of trip generation and parking generation calculations, the GFA of any parking garages within the building should not be included within the GFA of the entire building.  The unit of measurement for office buildings is currently GFA; however, it may be desirable to also obtain data related to gross rentable area and net rentable area. 

Definitions of Land-use Categories

The following land-use definitions are derived from the ITE Trip Generation (10th Edition) publication.  They have been modified as appropriate for the City of Portland.  ITE land-use codes are shown; where multiple codes are listed, the code used for trip generation is marked with an asterisk (*).  Several categories (Multiple Family, Convenience Market and Administrative Office) have definitions that are derived from the ITE but use trip rates based on observed Person Trip data (survey sites in Portland, California, and Washington, D.C.)  These land use codes are marked with a caret (^).

Residential

Single Family, detached:  Includes all single-family detached homes. (ITE # 210) Homes are stratified by size within the fee schedule.  Single family homes (including ADUs) smaller than 1,200 square feet are charged at 50% of the full Single Family rate.

Multi Family: A building designed to house two or more families living independently of each other. Includes low-rise, mid-rise, and high-rise apartments.  (ITE # 220) Also applies to row houses/townhouses/condos. (ITE # 230^)

Senior Housing/Assisted Living/Nursing Home: Residential units similar to apartments or condominiums restricted to senior citizens. (ITE # 252*).  Also includes assisted living facilities (ITE # 253) and nursing homes (ITE # 620).

Commercial-Services

Bank: A building, with or without a drive-up window, for the custody or exchange of money, and for facilitating the transmission of funds. (ITE # 911*, 912)

Day Care: A facility for the care of infant and preschool age children during the daytime hours.  Generally, includes classrooms, offices, eating areas, and a playground. This also includes preschools. (ITE # 520)

Hotel/Motel: A place of lodging providing sleeping accommodations.  May include restaurants, cocktail lounges, meeting and banquet rooms or convention facilities.  (ITE # 310*, 320)

Service Station/Gasoline Sales: A facility used for the sale of gasoline, oil, and lubricants.  May include areas for servicing or repairing vehicles.  May include a minimart and/or carwash. (ITE # 945)

Movie Theater/Event Hall: Movie theaters consist of audience seating, with one or more screens, and a lobby and refreshment stand.  Typically includes matinee showings. Also applies to event halls that offer entertainment activities.  (ITE # 444)

Carwash: Manual operations where the driver parks and washes the vehicle in a stall, or an automated facility for the same purpose. (ITE # 947)

Health Club/Racquet Club: Privately owned facility that may include swimming pools and whirlpools, saunas, weight-lifting and gymnastics equipment, exercise classes, tennis, racquetball, and handball courts.  May feature exercise sports and other active physical conditioning, as well as a broader range of services such as juice bars and meeting rooms.  (ITE #s 492*, 493)

Commercial-Institutional

School, K-12: Covers full range of primary and secondary schools.  Includes elementary, junior high, middle school and high school uses. Both public and private schools are included in this land use. (ITE# 520, 522, 530, average)

University/College/Junior College: Facilities of higher education including two-year, technical, four-year and graduate-level institutions. (ITE # 540, 550, average)

Church: A building providing public worship facilities.  Generally, houses assembly hall or sanctuary, meeting rooms, classrooms, and occasionally dining facilities.  (ITE # 560)

Hospital: A building or buildings designed for the medical, surgical diagnosis, treatment and housing of persons under the care of doctors and nurses.  Rest homes, nursing homes, convalescent homes and clinics are separate uses.  (ITE #610)

Park: Parks are typically owned and operated by the City, but may include private uses.  They can vary widely as to location, type and number of facilities, including recreational centers, boating or swimming facilities, sport fields, playgrounds and picnic facilities.  Fee applies to creation of a developed park from existing undeveloped park land or from newly acquired land.  A developed park includes at least one built amenity that provides a park experience beyond open space.  Land preserved for natural areas, trails and trailheads are not considered developed parks for TSDC purposes. (ITE # 411)

Commercial-Restaurant

Restaurant (standalone): An eating establishment that sells prepared food or beverages and generally offers accommodations for consuming the food or beverage on the premises.  Usually serves breakfast, lunch, and/or dinner; does not have a drive-up window. Fees apply to standalone restaurants not directly connected to other shopping facilities. (ITE # 931)

Quick Service Restaurant (Drive-through): An eating establishment that offers quick food service and a limited menu of items.  Food is generally served in disposable wrappings or containers, and may be consumed inside or outside the restaurant building.  Restaurants in this category have a drive-up window.  (ITE # 934)

Commercial-Retail

Shopping/Retail: Includes most forms of retail establishments, located in an integrated group of commercial establishments in a shopping center or designated retail area.   Also includes retail space within a mixed-use building.  (This definition does not cover Convenience Markets, Movie Theater/Event Halls or Quick Service Restaurants (Drive-Throughs); these uses will be assessed at their own respective rate.)  For the purpose of this definition a mixed-use building consists of two or more of the following land use categories; residential, shopping/retail, entertainment, hotel/motel, or office.  These land use categories have similar internal trip-making characteristics.  (ITE #820)

Convenience Market: A use that combines retail food sales with fast food or take-out food service, is under 4,000 SF in area, requires a package store liquor license, and is open more than 15 hours per day.  If gasoline sales are included on-site, use Service Station/Gasoline Sales TSDC rate. (ITE # 851^)

Free-Standing Retail Store/Supermarket:  Includes free-standing retail stores, including big-box stores of various types and supermarkets.   Use the Shopping/Retail category for retail stores in a mixed-use building. (ITE # 815)

Car Sales (New/Used): Facilities are generally located as strip development along major arterial streets that already have a preponderance of commercial development.  Generally included are auto services and parts sales along with a sometimes substantial used-car operation.  Some dealerships also include leasing activities and truck sales and servicing. (ITE # 840)

Commercial-Office

Administrative Office: An administrative office building houses one or more tenants and is the location where affairs of a business, commercial or industrial organization, professional person or firm are conducted.  The building or buildings may be limited to one tenant, either the owner or lessee, or contain a mixture of tenants including professional services, insurance companies, investment brokers, and company headquarters.    (ITE # 710^)

Medical Office/Clinic: A facility that provides diagnoses and outpatient care on a routine basis but does not provide prolonged in-house medical/surgical care.  A medical office is generally operated by either a single private physician/dentist or a group of doctors and/or dentist. (ITE # 720)

Industrial

Light Industrial/Manufacturing:  A facility that may contain industrial or manufacturing uses.  Manufacturing facilities have the primary activity of converting raw materials or parts into finished products.  In addition to the actual production of goods, manufacturing facilities may also have office, warehouse, research and associated functions. Light Industrial facilities may be characterized by a mix of manufacturing, service and warehouse functions.  Many produce goods by assembling other products, such as assembly of computers or other electronics.  (ITE # 110*, 130)

Warehouse/Storage: Warehouses are primarily devoted to the storage of materials, but may also include limited office and maintenance areas. (ITE # 150)

Self Storage: Buildings in which a number of storage units or vaults are rented for the storage of goods.  Each unit is physically separated from other units, and access is usually provided through an overhead door or other common access point.  (ITE # 151)