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The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) issues "complex" temporary street use permits to close sidewalks, all types of travel lanes, or entire streets, and for reserving on-street parking needed for such closures, for things like construction, utility work, crane lifts, and tree trimming.
The Temporary Street Use Permitting team at the Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) can help you reserve on-street parking for residential or commercial moves, loading and unloading, construction, tree trimming, and other uses. Determine the type of permit you need below. Fees apply.
Before beginning any voluntary demolition or repair work in the pedestrian sidewalk corridor, you or your contractor must have a Minor Improvement Permit (MIP) from the Bureau of Transportation. Fees are between $60 and $200 per permit for 50-lineal feet of frontage repair.
How to apply for an exception to the driveway standards of 17.28.110.
Information on Driveway Permits for rights-of-way controlled by the City of Portland.
Standards for Driveway access for rights-of-way controlled by the City of Portland.
The City's policy regarding Encroachments into the Public Right-of-Way. Access the Encroachment Permit Application and find out about the Encroachment Permit Review Process.
This page contains the requirements and forms needed to apply for a permit to perform test bores, pavement cores, potholing, general excavations, as well as decommissioning or removing underground storage tanks or monitoring wells within City of Portland public right-of-way.
This section covers Portland Bureau of Transportation's (PBOT) insurance and bond requirements for temporary street-use permits, street-opening permits, sewer connection permits, minor construction, sidewalk cafes and vending, community events, and utility installation in the public right-of-way.
In Spring 2016, the City adopted the Local Transportation Infrastructure Charge (LTIC), a charge on new infill development occurring on these streets in single-dwelling residential zones. The LTIC provides a more predictable and simple option for developers to meet their obligations.
In Spring 2018, Council approved the LTIC allocation methodology for select projects for financed improvements. This methodology is consistent with the City’s equity goals, ADA requirements, and adopted neighborhood transportation and stormwater plans.
PBOT has updated the PBOT Development Review Manual to Creating Public Streets and Connections. This manual contains information for designing public improvements consistent with the authority granted to PBOT under City Code in relation to land use and building permit actions.
Overview of how to determine what street and sidewalk improvements will be triggered as part of a development proposal. Improvement requirements can be triggered by Land Use Reviews or Building Permits.
The Temporary Street Use Permitting team at the Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) issues permits for temporary use of the public right of way, including parking, sidewalk, lane and street closures. Permits are issued as per Title 16, 17 and 24 of Portland City Code.
PBOT is updating City Code Sections 17.88.010 and 17.107.030 to align with existing Title 33 regulations.
This page lists new or recently updated city code and transportation administrative rules.
Resources for Utilities, Structures & Sewers in the Public Right-of-Way
Cellular and wireless providers are looking to install and expand networks of small cells throughout urban areas to improve coverage, quality, resilience and increase cellular network capacity to meet the increasing demand on their current networks served by cell towers (also known as macro cells).
Cellular and wireless providers are looking to install and expand networks of small cells throughout urban areas to improve coverage, quality, resilience and increase cellular network capacity to meet the increasing demand on their current networks served by cell towers (also known as macro cells).