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COVID-19 Risk Level for Multnomah County: High Risk

Services, guides, and information

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The Portland in the Streets team at the Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) issues free Block Party permits for residents to close their street for fun parties with their neighbors.
The Portland in the Streets team at the Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) issues Community Event permits to close streets, travel lanes, sidewalks, and parking spaces for events such as farmers markets, street fairs, cultural events, fundraisers and so much more!
The Portland Bureau of Transportation’s (PBOT) Healthy Businesses permit allows temporary changes to streets to give people more space to conduct business safely amid our current public health crisis. Winter permits expire March 31, 2021. Applications for Healthy Businesses permits now open.
Organizations such as food pantries, schools, or health clinics providing direct services related to Covid-19 may apply to the Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) for help with traffic control if you expect a temporary spike in vehicle traffic or other traffic disruptions.
The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) issues PARK(ing) Day permits to allow residents, designers, businesses, students, community organizations and artists to temporarily transform parking spaces into public spaces. This international event takes place the third Friday in September.
The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) encourages people to create new public space by closing a portion of the street to vehicles. Pedestrian plazas may occur on any street type that is next to or in close proximity to a partnering business or organization.
The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) issues "complex" temporary street use permits to close sidewalks, all types of travel lanes, or entire streets, and for reserving on-street parking needed for such closures, for things like construction, utility work, crane lifts, and tree trimming.
The Temporary Street Use Permitting team at the Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) can help you reserve on-street parking for residential or commercial moves, loading and unloading, construction, tree trimming, and other uses. Determine the type of permit you need below. Fees apply.
The Portland in the Streets team at the Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) issues Sidewalk Café permits to allow businesses to place tables and seating on the public sidewalk. Businesses must sell food and beverages to apply for a Sidewalk Café permit.
Before beginning any voluntary demolition or repair work in the pedestrian sidewalk corridor, you or your contractor must have a Minor Improvement Permit (MIP) from the Bureau of Transportation. Fees are between $60 and $200 per permit for 50-lineal feet of frontage repair.
The Portland in the Streets team at the Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) issues Spaces to Places permits to beautify, repurpose, and energize public spaces into social or cultural areas. These projects should be designed to be long-term and must be open to the public.
The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT), through the Portland in the Streets program issues Special Event Permits to allow moving events on city streets or sidewalks. Types of events include marches, parades, athletic events, demonstrations, etc. There is a $25 non-refundable application fee.
The Portland in the Streets team at the Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) issues permits for painting art in the road. These street paintings are a great Portland tradition that bring neighborhoods together and encourage neighbors to get to know each other.
The Portland in the Streets team at the Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) issues Street Seats permits for structures or platforms built in on-street parking spaces to help activate the public space. You can use them as additional seating for your restaurant or for public use.
The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) through the Portland in the Streets program issues Vending Cart permits to allow vendors to sell food or merchandise using a small mobile cart. Vendors with a permit can vend at specific locations on the public sidewalk.
The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) may require traffic control for work in the public right-of-way. Equipment may be bought or rented. Here are basic examples of traffic control and a partial list of vendors in the Portland area. Vendor list does not indicate a preference.
Use this page as a guide for your placemaking project. We list granting resources, how-to's, and placemaking case studies. The goal is to encourage Portland residents to energize and beautify their neighborhoods. We hope that you will find the resources found here to be useful.
How to apply for an exception to the driveway standards of 17.28.110.
Information on Driveway Permits for rights-of-way controlled by the City of Portland.
Standards for Driveway access for rights-of-way controlled by the City of Portland.
This page contains the requirements and forms needed to apply for a permit to perform test bores, pavement cores, potholing, general excavations, as well as decommissioning or removing underground storage tanks or monitoring wells within City of Portland public right-of-way.
As part of a development permit or land use application, the landowner may be required to grant an easement to the City for public right-of-way purposes. This is often referred to as a “dedication.”