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Stay home. Save lives. Portland enters phase 1 of reopening.

Services, guides, and information

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The Portland in the Streets team at the Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) issues free Block Party permits for residents to close their street for fun parties with their neighbors.
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The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) throught the Portland in the Streets program issues permits to place combined publication boxes in Portland's street space. Combined publication boxes display several publications (newspapers, magazines, etc.) in one location.
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The Portland in the Streets team at the Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) issues Community Event permits to close streets, travel lanes, sidewalks, and parking spaces for events such as farmers markets, street fairs, cultural events, fundraisers and so much more!
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The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) has launched the Safe Streets Initiative in response to the Covid-19 public health crisis. Part of this initiative is a Business Toolkit, and this Healthy Businesses permit, which helps businesses use more public space to conduct business safely.
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The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) issues PARK(ing) Day permits to allow residents, designers, businesses, students, community organizations and artists to temporarily transform parking spaces into public spaces. This international event takes place the third Friday in September.
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The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) encourages people to create new public space by closing a portion of the street to vehicles. Pedestrian plazas may occur on any street type that is next to or in close proximity to a partnering business or organization.
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Due to restrictions caused by the COVID-19 situation, we may not be able to fulfill your permit request. If you have any questions or concerns, our sole point of contact at this time will be CPAC@portlandoregon.gov. We will not be available by phone.
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The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) through the Portland in the Streets program issues banner permits over street spaces to promote various neighborhood and charitable events or occasions in the community. These may include farmers' markets, street fairs, and so much more.
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Due to restrictions caused by the COVID-19 situation, we may not be able to fulfill your permit request. If you have any questions or concerns, our sole point of contact at this time will be CPAC@portlandoregon.gov. We will not be available by phone.
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The Portland in the Streets team at the Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) issues Sidewalk Café permits to allow businesses to place tables and seating on the public sidewalk. Businesses must sell food and beverages to apply for a Sidewalk Café permit.
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The Portland in the Streets team at the Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) issues Spaces to Places permits to beautify, repurpose, and energize public spaces into social or cultural areas. These projects should be designed to be long-term and must be open to the public.
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The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT), through the Portland in the Streets program issues Special Event Permits to allow moving events on city streets or sidewalks. Types of events include marches, parades, athletic events, demonstrations, etc. There is a $25 non-refundable application fee.
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The Portland in the Streets team at the Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) issues permits for painting art in the road. These street paintings are a great Portland tradition that bring neighborhoods together and encourage neighbors to get to know each other.
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The Portland in the Streets team at the Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) issues Street Seats permits for structures or platforms built in on-street parking spaces to help activate the public space. You can use them as additional seating for your restaurant or for public use.
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The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) through the Portland in the Streets program issues Vending Cart permits to allow vendors to sell food or merchandise using a small mobile cart. Vendors with a permit can vend at specific locations on the public sidewalk.
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The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) through the Portland in the Streets program encourages people to adopt green spaces. The Stewardship Program is a partnership between PBOT and community partners. The community partner maintains the adopted space often adding perennials and native plants.
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The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) may require traffic control for work in the public right-of-way. Equipment may be bought or rented. Here are basic examples of traffic control and a partial list of vendors in the Portland area. Vendor list does not indicate a preference.
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This page contains the requirements and forms needed to apply for a permit to perform test bores, pavement cores, potholing, general excavations, as well as decommissioning or removing underground storage tanks or monitoring wells within City of Portland public right-of-way.
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As part of a development permit or land use application, the landowner may be required to grant an easement to the City for public right-of-way purposes. This is often referred to as a “dedication.”
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This section covers Portland Bureau of Transportation's (PBOT) insurance and bond requirements for temporary street-use permits, street-opening permits, sewer connection permits, minor construction, sidewalk cafes and vending, community events, and utility installation in the public right-of-way.
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The Portland in the Streets team at the Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) is piloting a Play Streets program which turns neighborhood streets into pop-up community hubs for multigenerational socializing, play, and physical activity.
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In Spring 2016, the City adopted the Local Transportation Infrastructure Charge (LTIC), a charge on new infill development occurring on these streets in single-dwelling residential zones. The LTIC provides a more predictable and simple option for developers to meet their obligations.
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In Spring 2018, Council approved the LTIC allocation methodology for select projects for financed improvements. This methodology is consistent with the City’s equity goals, ADA requirements, and adopted neighborhood transportation and stormwater plans.
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Due to restrictions caused by the COVID-19 situation, we may not be able to fulfill your permit request. If you have any questions or concerns, our sole point of contact at this time will be CPAC@portlandoregon.gov. We will not be available by phone.
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Overview of how to determine what street and sidewalk improvements will be triggered as part of a development proposal. Improvement requirements can be triggered by Land Use Reviews or Building Permits.
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Newly created public and private street segments are named during the plat review process or via an Easement for Right-of-Way Purposes.
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A street vacation extinguishes the public’s interest in street right-of-way. When street area is vacated, control is passed to the underlying fee owner, most often the abutting property owner but not always.
If you are interested in vacating a street, email pbotrwa@portlandoregon.gov to inquire.
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The Temporary Street Use Permitting team at the Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) issues permits for temporary use of the public right of way, including parking, sidewalk, lane and street closures. Permits are issued as per Title 16, 17 and 24 of Portland City Code.
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Resources for Utilities, Structures & Sewers in the Public Right-of-Way
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Certain utility vaults that are constructed in the right-of-way as a result of new development may require that the owner or tenant enter into a lease with City for this privatization of the public right-of-way.
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Cellular and wireless providers are looking to install and expand networks of small cells throughout urban areas to improve coverage, quality, resilience and increase cellular network capacity to meet the increasing demand on their current networks served by cell towers (also known as macro cells).
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Cellular and wireless providers are looking to install and expand networks of small cells throughout urban areas to improve coverage, quality, resilience and increase cellular network capacity to meet the increasing demand on their current networks served by cell towers (also known as macro cells).
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The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) has launched the Safe Streets Initiative in response to the Covid-19 public health crisis. Part of this initiative is a Business Toolkit, including permits, that allow temporary changes to streets to give people more space to conduct business safely.