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Services, guides, and information

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The Portland in the Streets team at the Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) issues free Block Party permits for residents to close their street for fun parties with their neighbors.
The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) throught the Portland in the Streets program issues permits to place combined publication boxes in Portland's street space. Combined publication boxes display several publications (newspapers, magazines, etc.) in one location.
The Portland in the Streets team at the Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) issues Community Event permits to close streets, travel lanes, sidewalks, and parking spaces for events such as farmers markets, street fairs, cultural events, fundraisers and so much more!
The Portland Bureau of Transportation’s (PBOT) Healthy Businesses permit allows temporary changes to streets to give people more space to conduct business safely amid our current public health crisis. Original permits expire Nov. 1. Applications for Winter Healthy Businesses permits now open.
Organizations such as food pantries, schools, or health clinics providing direct services related to Covid-19 may apply to the Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) for help with traffic control if you expect a temporary spike in vehicle traffic or other traffic disruptions.
The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) issues PARK(ing) Day permits to allow residents, designers, businesses, students, community organizations and artists to temporarily transform parking spaces into public spaces. This international event takes place the third Friday in September.
The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) encourages people to create new public space by closing a portion of the street to vehicles. Pedestrian plazas may occur on any street type that is next to or in close proximity to a partnering business or organization.
The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) issues "complex" temporary street use permits to close sidewalks, all types of travel lanes, or entire streets, and for reserving on-street parking needed for such closures, for things like construction, utility work, crane lifts, and tree trimming.
The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) through the Portland in the Streets program issues banner permits over street spaces to promote various neighborhood and charitable events or occasions in the community. These may include farmers' markets, street fairs, and so much more.
The Temporary Street Use Permitting team at the Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) can help you reserve on-street parking for residential or commercial moves, loading and unloading, construction, tree trimming, and other uses. Determine the type of permit you need below. Fees apply.
The Portland in the Streets team at the Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) issues Sidewalk Café permits to allow businesses to place tables and seating on the public sidewalk. Businesses must sell food and beverages to apply for a Sidewalk Café permit.
Before beginning any voluntary demolition or repair work in the pedestrian sidewalk corridor, you or your contractor must have a Minor Improvement Permit (MIP) from the Bureau of Transportation. Fees are between $60 and $200 per permit for 50-lineal feet of frontage repair.
The Portland in the Streets team at the Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) issues Spaces to Places permits to beautify, repurpose, and energize public spaces into social or cultural areas. These projects should be designed to be long-term and must be open to the public.
The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT), through the Portland in the Streets program issues Special Event Permits to allow moving events on city streets or sidewalks. Types of events include marches, parades, athletic events, demonstrations, etc. There is a $25 non-refundable application fee.
The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) through the Portland in the Streets program encourages people to adopt green spaces. The Stewardship Program is a partnership between PBOT and community partners. The community partner maintains the adopted space often adding perennials and native plants.
The Portland in the Streets team at the Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) issues permits for painting art in the road. These street paintings are a great Portland tradition that bring neighborhoods together and encourage neighbors to get to know each other.
The Portland in the Streets team at the Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) issues Street Seats permits for structures or platforms built in on-street parking spaces to help activate the public space. You can use them as additional seating for your restaurant or for public use.
The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) through the Portland in the Streets program issues Vending Cart permits to allow vendors to sell food or merchandise using a small mobile cart. Vendors with a permit can vend at specific locations on the public sidewalk.
The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) may require traffic control for work in the public right-of-way. Equipment may be bought or rented. Here are basic examples of traffic control and a partial list of vendors in the Portland area. Vendor list does not indicate a preference.
Use this page as a guide for your placemaking project. We list granting resources, how-to's, and placemaking case studies. The goal is to encourage Portland residents to energize and beautify their neighborhoods. We hope that you will find the resources found here to be useful.
How to apply for an exception to the driveway standards of 17.28.110.
Information on Driveway Permits for rights-of-way controlled by the City of Portland.
Standards for Driveway access for rights-of-way controlled by the City of Portland.
This page contains the requirements and forms needed to apply for a permit to perform test bores, pavement cores, potholing, general excavations, as well as decommissioning or removing underground storage tanks or monitoring wells within City of Portland public right-of-way.
As part of a development permit or land use application, the landowner may be required to grant an easement to the City for public right-of-way purposes. This is often referred to as a “dedication.”
We would like to share potential granting sources with you for your project. This list is not exhaustive. These grants have much potential for funding a Portland in the Streets project. In general, they grant projects that benefit community and promote neighborhood resiliency.
This section covers Portland Bureau of Transportation's (PBOT) insurance and bond requirements for temporary street-use permits, street-opening permits, sewer connection permits, minor construction, sidewalk cafes and vending, community events, and utility installation in the public right-of-way.
The Portland in the Streets team at the Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) is piloting a Play Streets program which turns neighborhood streets into pop-up community hubs for multigenerational socializing, play, and physical activity.
In Spring 2016, the City adopted the Local Transportation Infrastructure Charge (LTIC), a charge on new infill development occurring on these streets in single-dwelling residential zones. The LTIC provides a more predictable and simple option for developers to meet their obligations.
In Spring 2018, Council approved the LTIC allocation methodology for select projects for financed improvements. This methodology is consistent with the City’s equity goals, ADA requirements, and adopted neighborhood transportation and stormwater plans.
PBOT has updated the PBOT Development Review Manual to Creating Public Streets and Connections. This manual contains information for designing public improvements consistent with the authority granted to PBOT under City Code in relation to land use and building permit actions.
You may renew an ongoing temporary street use permit with the Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT), or reissue a permit you have had in the past.
Portland City Code gives you the option of requesting a modification to some Transportation decisions through an administrative review by the Transportation Enforcement Program Manager.
Overview of how to determine what street and sidewalk improvements will be triggered as part of a development proposal. Improvement requirements can be triggered by Land Use Reviews or Building Permits.
The enforcement program plays a critical role in providing safe mobility options to Portlanders.
The City of Portland Sidewalk Program oversees the maintenance of City sidewalks, curbs, and corners.The program's goal is to ensure that all sidewalks are safe and accessible for pedestrians and to help prevent injuries caused by defective sidewalks
The Bureau of Transportation has two groups of Construction Inspectors, depending on the type of permit issued:
Information
Newly created public and private street segments are named during the plat review process or via an Easement for Right-of-Way Purposes.
Information
A street vacation extinguishes the public’s interest in street right-of-way. When street area is vacated, control is passed to the underlying fee owner, most often the abutting property owner but not always.
If you are interested in vacating a street, email pbotrwa@portlandoregon.gov to inquire.
If you will be working within 5 feet of the trackway or 10 feet of the overhead contact wire, you will need a Track Access Permit from Portland Streetcar. Currently, there is no fee for the permit, but the permit allows us to collaborate with you and maintain safety for all concerned.
The Temporary Street Use Permitting team at the Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) issues permits for temporary use of the public right of way, including parking, sidewalk, lane and street closures. Permits are issued as per Title 16, 17 and 24 of Portland City Code.
Are you applying for, or planning to apply for, a building permit (or any other City approval) for development in the City of Portland? If the answer is yes, the information about Transportation System Development Charges (TSDCs) and the City's development review process will be of interest to you.
This page lists new or recently updated city code and transportation administrative rules.
Resources for Utilities, Structures & Sewers in the Public Right-of-Way
Information
Certain utility vaults that are constructed in the right-of-way as a result of new development may require that the owner or tenant enter into a lease with City for this privatization of the public right-of-way.
Cellular and wireless providers are looking to install and expand networks of small cells throughout urban areas to improve coverage, quality, resilience and increase cellular network capacity to meet the increasing demand on their current networks served by cell towers (also known as macro cells).
Cellular and wireless providers are looking to install and expand networks of small cells throughout urban areas to improve coverage, quality, resilience and increase cellular network capacity to meet the increasing demand on their current networks served by cell towers (also known as macro cells).
The Portland Bureau of Transportation’s (PBOT) Healthy Businesses permit allows temporary changes to streets to give people more space to conduct business safely amid our current public health crisis. Original permits expire Nov. 1, 2020. Applications for Winter Healthy Businesses permits now open.
波特兰市交通局(PBOT)推出了“安全道路计划”来因应新冠病毒(COVID-19)公共卫生危机。这个计划中包括含许可证计划在内的“商业工具包”,允许对街道做出暂时的改动,让人们有更多空间来安全经营业务。
如果在公共通行空间施工,波特兰市交通局(PBOT)可能会要求进行交通管制。可以买或租设备。以下是一些基本交通控制设备示例及波特兰地区部分供应商的名单。供应商名单并不表示我们对其的偏好。