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Tell us about your experience using PBOT’s temporary bus platforms

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A sidewalk decal and lawn sign, both advertising a new public survey, at the rubber modular temporary platform at NW 18th Avenue and Flanders Street. Photo by PBOT.
A sidewalk decal and lawn sign, both advertising a new public survey, at the rubber modular temporary bus platform at NW 18th Avenue and Flanders Street. Photo by PBOT.

(Nov. 10, 2021) The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) recently kicked off an evaluation of 10 temporary platforms recently installed around Portland. The evaluation will help decide if and how we use them in the future. What we learn could inform design refinements, context considerations, implementation, and maintenance needs.

In 2020 and 2021, in partnership with TriMet, PBOT installed two types of temporary platforms. The temporary platforms include five rubber modular platforms and five asphalt platforms.

These temporary platforms, generally used at transit stops, help PBOT make quick, affordable changes on city streets. Ultimately, these temporary platforms are intended to make it easier for people to walk, bike, and take transit. The platform designs vary because they were installed to meet different needs depending upon the location.

Platform Type 1: Rubber modular temporary platforms

A rubber modular temporary bus stop platform on SE Hawthorne Boulevard at the bus stop near 6th Avenue. Photo by PBOT.
A rubber modular temporary bus stop platform on SE Hawthorne Boulevard at the bus stop near 6th Avenue. Photo by PBOT.

The rubber modular temporary bus stop platform allows for people biking to ride up and over the platform, allows for the bus to stop in lane and provides people with more space while waiting for the bus, boarding and de-boarding. 

Platform Type 2: Asphalt temporary bus stop platform

An asphalt temporary bus platform on SE Stark Street at the TriMet bus stop near SE 90th Avenue. Photo by PBOT.
An asphalt temporary bus platform on SE Stark Street at the TriMet bus stop near SE 90th Avenue. Photo by PBOT.

The asphalt temporary platform does not include a space for bikes, but allows for the bus to stop in lane and provides people with more space while waiting for the bus, boarding and de-boarding. 

As part of the evaluation, the bureau is interested in learning about the user experience of these platforms. We want to hear from you about how you use these platforms – whether you bike through them on your ride or for boarding TriMet buses – and if having them installed has made a difference in your accessibility, safety, and comfort.

Please take the online survey to tell us about your experience with any of the temporary platforms: Click here to take the survey 

The survey is now open from November 3, 2021 through January 3, 2022.

A map of all 10 temporary bus stop platforms by type across Portland.
A map of all 10 temporary bus stop platforms by type across Portland.

A technical evaluation is also underway. PBOT is studying the installation and maintenance needs for these platforms to capture lessons learned from those who install, maintain, and interact with the platforms (such as bus operators).

The user survey went live on November 3, 2021 and will stay open until January 3, 2022. We plan to engage with technical staff in the coming months and anticipate the results of the evaluation and recommendations in mid-2022.

For more information, visit the project website at www.portland.gov/transportation/rose-lanes/temporary-platform-evaluation.

Contact

Rose Lane Project

April Bertelsen, PBOT Project Manager

Hannah Schafer

PBOT Communications Coordinator