information
COVID-19 Safety, Recovery and Resilience

Face coverings are required in indoor public spaces and many outdoor spaces. State policy
Access City programs, people and projects helping Portland recover. Portland United

Volunteer. Play. Stay. Shop. Show the Rose City a little love. Here for Portland

Services and Resources

21 services and resources found
Fire performance art requires that both the artist and the venue have a fire permit. Fire performance artists must have a permit for each performance.
This annual permit may be requested by public assembly occupancies for events such as concerts, banquets, graduations, etc. where the same floor plan is used for multiple events. This cannot be used for non-assembly buildings, trade shows, outside tents, fenced outside events or haunted houses.
Permits are required for temporary events that may pose a fire and life safety hazard. This includes: events of 500 or more in an assembly building, 49 or more in a non-assembly building or fenced outdoor area, trade shows with six or more booths, and any haunted house.
Permits are required for the use of tents or membrane structures. These are temporary structures, enclosures or shelters, with or without sidewalls or drops, constructed of fabric or pliable material and supported by any manner except by air or the contents.
Fire performance art requires that both the artist and the venue have a fire permit. Fire performance artists must have a permit for each performance. The venue can get a single use permit or an annual permit.
A permit is required for use of lasers needing a federal variance. This includes use at concerts, theater performances, and other gatherings for entertainment purposes.
Fire permit application for the use of pyrotechnic or special effects at concerts, movies, plays, theatrical productions, etc.
Any business that offers games which cost money to play must apply for a permit and pay a fee. A permit is required whether or not the business owns the devices. Permits expire on December 31 and must be renewed each year.
The Portland in the Streets team at the Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) issues free Block Party permits for residents to close their street for fun parties with their neighbors.
The Portland in the Streets team at the Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) issues Community Event permits to close streets, travel lanes, sidewalks, and parking spaces for events such as farmers markets, street fairs, cultural events, fundraisers and so much more!
The Portland Bureau of Transportation’s (PBOT) Healthy Blocks permit allows temporary changes to streets to give people more space to stay active safely amid our current public health crisis. Applications for Healthy Blocks permits are open.
The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) issues "complex" temporary street use permits to close sidewalks, all types of travel lanes, or entire streets, and for reserving on-street parking needed for such closures, for things like construction, utility work, crane lifts, and tree trimming.
The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) through the Portland in the Streets program issues banner permits over street spaces to promote various neighborhood and charitable events or occasions in the community. These may include farmers' markets, street fairs, and so much more.
The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT), through the Portland in the Streets program issues Special Event Permits to allow moving events on city streets or sidewalks. Types of events include marches, parades, athletic events, demonstrations, etc. There is a $25 non-refundable application fee.
Street paintings are large, decorative paintings installed directly on the street to beautify neighborhoods and build community.
Nonprofits may apply to Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) to hang banners on city streetlights to promote special events that are open to the public, non-political, and have a direct civic benefit. Certain conditions apply. Banner permits cost $110 with an additional fee of $1 per pole.