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COVID-19 Risk Level for Multnomah County: Lower Risk
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Regional chlorine shortage: Portland water remains safe to drink

A regional chlorine shortage has disrupted supplies. The Portland Water Bureau is monitoring the situation and evaluating our supplies and procedures. Get updates.

Services and Resources for Environment

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Whether you can compost – and what goes in the compost bin – varies depending on where you live or work.
Look up your garbage company's name and contact information. Find out what days to set out your trash, recycling and compost. And sign up for garbage day email reminders or download a printable garbage collection schedule.
What you can – and can’t – put in your garbage can.
Whether you’re at home, work, or school, the materials you can recycle are the same. Mixed paper, plastic bottles and tubs, and metal containers and foil, are all allowed in the recycling bins together. Glass bottles and jars go in a separate “glass-only” labeled container.
City of Portland climate data report updates carbon emissions data for Multnomah County.
The Bill Naito Award was created to honor the stories of individuals, organizations or projects that have continued Bill's work and reflect his dedication. Together, these stories weave a picture of our community's dedication to Portland's urban forest heritage.
This list provides options for tree selection when planting in 3.0 to 3.9 foot wide planting spaces with or without high voltage power lines.
This list provides options for tree selection when planting in 4.0 to 5.9 foot wide planting spaces with high voltage power lines.
This list provides options for tree selection when planting in 6.0 foot wide planting spaces with high voltage power lines.
This list provides options for tree selection when planting in 8.5 foot wide and greater planting spaces without high voltage power lines.

Abies concolor

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Abies grandis

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Abies pinsapo

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Purpose, background, timeline and contact information for the Columbia Corridor/Industrial Lands Environmental Project.
Combined sewer overflows to the Willamette River and Columbia Slough are rare. But when they do occur, Portlanders are advised to stay out of the water for 48 hours following a CSO due to higher levels of bacteria and other contaminants. Find out if a CSO is happening now.

About Green Streets

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Green streets reduce sewer overflows and backups by slowing and absorbing stormwater runoff from sidewalks and streets. Also known as rain gardens or bioswales, green streets are important to the City’s sewer and stormwater systems. They also help prevent pollution from washing into our rivers.
The Percent for Green grant program is open to community groups who would like to complete large-scale green infrastructure projects that provide broad benefits for watershed health and the community. Grants range from $20,000 to $100,000. Projects usually take about two years to complete.
The City of Portland is developing proposals to address tree preservation during development activities.
Spanning 20 years at a ratepayer investment of $1.4 billion, the Big Pipe Project has reduced combined sewer overflows to the Willamette River by 94 percent and to the Columbia Slough by 99 percent. With most overflows eliminated, the Willamette is cleaner than it’s been in decades.