Services and Resources for Environment

Learn what can and can’t go in your green compost bin in Portland. For homes, that includes food and yard waste. At businesses, it's food only.
Look up your garbage company's name and contact information. Find out what days to set out your trash, recycling and compost. And sign up for garbage day email reminders or download a printable garbage collection schedule.
Learn what can and can’t go in your garbage bin in Portland.
Paper, plastic, and metal go in your blue recycling bin. Glass should always be collected in a separate glass-only bin. Whether you’re at home, work, or school, the materials you can recycle in Portland are the same.
Pressure washing and graffiti removal generate pollutants that are harmful to human health and the environment. Wash water from these activities is prohibited from flowing to the city's stormwater system. Follow these best management practices to properly contain wash water and prevent pollution.
The Bill Naito Award was created to honor the stories of individuals, organizations or projects that have continued Bill's work and reflect his dedication. Together, these stories weave a picture of our community's dedication to Portland's urban forest heritage.
This list provides options for tree selection when planting in 3.0 to 3.9 foot wide planting spaces with or without high voltage power lines.
This list provides options for tree selection when planting in 4.0 to 5.9 foot wide planting spaces with high voltage power lines.
This list provides options for tree selection when planting in 6.0 foot wide planting spaces with high voltage power lines.
This list provides options for tree selection when planting in 8.5 foot wide and greater planting spaces without high voltage power lines.
The City of Portland was the first in the United States to draft a carbon reduction strategy. Learn more about the process behind it.

Abies concolor

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Abies grandis

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Abies pinsapo

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This project will adjust the location of environmental overlay zones in the Columbia Corridor and other industrial areas to match the locations of streams, wetlands, sloughs, vegetation and wildlife habitat.
Combined sewer overflows to the Willamette River and Columbia Slough are rare. But when they do occur, Portlanders are advised to stay out of the water for 48 hours following a CSO due to higher levels of bacteria and other contaminants. Find out if a CSO is happening now.

About Green Streets

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Green streets reduce sewer overflows and backups by slowing and absorbing stormwater runoff from sidewalks and streets. Also known as rain gardens or bioswales, green streets are important to the City’s sewer and stormwater systems. They also help prevent pollution from washing into our rivers.