191402

Ordinance

Authorize competitive solicitation and contract for the design, permitting, construction documentation, and construction administration services for the North Portland Aquatic Center

Passed

The City of Portland ordains:

Section 1.  The Council finds:

  1. Portland Parks & Recreation (PP&R) promotes health, livability, and economic development vitality through the effective management of the city's award-winning parks and recreation system.
  2. City Council approved Ordinance 191038 on Wednesday, October 19, 2022 to authorize a contract with ELS Architecture and Urban Design to provide the initial design efforts for site selection, programming, schematic design and land use permitting services for the North Portland Aquatic Center. This contract effort included extensive community engagement process to determine the final site, program and schematic design elements for the new facility.
  3. Ordinance 191038 added the North Portland Aquatic Center Project to the PP&R's Capital Improvement Plan (CIP) Project list previously approved under Ordinance 187770 by Council on May 25, 2016.
  4. City Council approved Ordinance 191105 on Wednesday, December 7, 2022 to accept a grant in the amount of $15 million from the State of Oregon Department of Administrative Services for design and construction of the North Portland Aquatic Center.
  5. The development of the North Portland Aquatic Center in the North Portland peninsula offers an excellent opportunity for PP&R to meet its Aquatic Center goal of providing equitable access to indoor aquatic programming to all Portland residents, and for implementing the Parks 2020 Vision goal to provide a wide variety of high-quality recreation services and opportunities for all residents.
  6. The development of the North Portland Aquatic Center will provide approximately 22,000 additional households with access to indoor aquatics programming.
  7. Professional, technical and/or expert (PTE) services of a firm to provide design, permitting, construction documentation, and construction administration is critical to the Aquatic Center development project. The PTE services will be advertised and solicited under the City Procurement policies and follow public contracting laws per the State of Oregon. The successful PTE proposer will be selected by a selection committee that will review and score the proposals in accordance with PCC 5.68.
  8. The City desires to enter into a PTE contract with a design firm to lead and successfully deliver the design, permitting, construction documentation and construction administration for the North Portland Aquatic Center. The current estimate for hard construction costs is an estimated range of approximately $54,500,000 (25-meter pool) or $69,900,000 (50-meter pool) with a Low Confidence Level Rating. Preliminary estimate of potential PTE contract costs range between $4 Million to $6.5 Million, with actual contract value dependent on the scope of services to be drafted by PP&R and Procurement Services Division and the proposals received.
  9. Work performed shall include the Certification Office for Business Inclusion and Diversity (COBID) for Disadvantaged, Minority, Women, Emerging Small Business or Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned Business Enterprises (D/M/W/ESB/SDVBE) (subcontracted) firms. The City of Portland’s aspirational participation goal for D/M/W/ESB/SDVBE utilization is 20%. PP&R will coordinate with Procurement Services Division on documenting compliance with or exceeding this City goal by the successful proposer (and its subconsultants) who are required to commit to making good faith efforts towards achieving the goal.
  10. Sufficient funds are available in the Parks Capital Improvement Program Fund, No. P10553.

NOW, THEREFORE, the Council directs:

  1. The Chief Procurement Officer, or designee, is authorized to collaborate with PP&R to prepare the scope of services for solicitation, and to enter into a PTE contract with a successful proposer for services described above for the North Portland Aquatics Center, with contract value estimates of approximately $4 Million and up to $6.5 Million, in a form substantially similar to the standard City contract upon approval as to form by the City Attorney.
  2. The Mayor and City Auditor are hereby authorized to draw and deliver checks payable to the successful proposer chargeable to Parks Capital Improvement Program Fund when demand is presented and approved by the proper authorities.

An ordinance when passed by the Council shall be signed by the Auditor. It shall be carefully filed and preserved in the custody of the Auditor (City Charter Chapter 2 Article 1 Section 2-122)

Passed by Council

Auditor of the City of Portland
Simone Rede

Impact Statement

Purpose of Proposed Legislation and Background Information

Authorize the Chief Procurement Officer to execute a contract with a successful proposer to provide the design, permitting, construction documentation, and construction administration for the North Portland Aquatic Center anticipated contract costs range between $4 Million to $6.5 Million, with actual contract value dependent on the scope of services to be drafted by PP&R and Procurement Services Division and the proposals received.  The City expects the proposers will submit responses that aim to deliver professional and high-quality services for lowest costs. This contract will cover design, permitting, construction documentation and construction administration for an indoor aquatic center in North Portland that balances the needs of the North Portland community with those of the greater region offering valued indoor aquatic amenities. This legislation does not change existing City policy.

Financial and Budgetary Impacts

Funds are available in Park’s Owner Cost Center P10553. Costs will be incurred during FY 2024 to FY 2027. Currently the project has $31.7M in total funding; of which $16.7 million is from Parks System Development Charge funding and $15 million funding from the State Lottery Bond program. While the scope of the project is still flexible and subject to the outcome of the work of the consultant, it is understood that additional funding will be necessary to complete the ultimate scope. The aquatic facility is estimated in the range of approximately $54,500,000 (25-meter pool) or $69,900,000 (50-meter pool) with a Low Confidence rating.

No positions will be created, eliminated, or re-classified as a result of this legislation. The estimated ongoing costs for this project (including operations and maintenance, programming, and capital major maintenance) will be developed in conjunction with the design and programming plan. Based on similar facilities and best practices, it is expected that ongoing costs will be several million dollars. Those ongoing costs will begin to be incurred in FY 2028-29. This is beyond the window of the current 5‑year Parks Local Option Levy (Parks Levy). It is expected that those costs will be borne by a successor resource to the Parks Levy as part of PP&R’s Sustainable Future effort.

Community Impacts and Community Involvement

There will be significant positive impacts of this City Council action. The development of an indoor aquatic center in the North Portland peninsula offers an excellent opportunity for Portland Parks and Recreation to meet its goal of providing equitable access to indoor aquatics amenities to all Portland residents.

Based on the 2014-2018 American Community Survey (ACS), the new indoor aquatic facility development will serve approximately 22,000 additional households or roughly 70,000 people: 24% people of color and 14% living below the poverty line, who currently do not have access to any indoor aquatic facilities. The new aquatic center will be located in North Portland and will potentially serve residents crossing 11 Portland neighborhood associations including:

  •   Arbor Lodge Neighborhood Association
  •   Bridgeton Neighborhood Association
  •   Cathedral Park Neighborhood Association
  •   East Columbia Neighborhood Association
  •   Hayden Island Neighborhood Network
  •   Kenton Neighborhood Association
  •   Overlook Neighborhood Association
  •   Piedmont Neighborhood Association
  •   Portsmouth Neighborhood Association
  •   St Johns Neighborhood Association
  •   University Park Neighborhood Association

We recognize, understand, and encourage celebration of the differences that surround us. Diversity and equity are vital to Portland Parks & Recreation's ideals and values. The North Portland area is more racially diverse with a higher share of Black, Indigenous, and Residents of Color than the City of Portland as a wholeThe Portsmouth neighborhood is the most racially diverse area on the peninsula and is one of the most racially diverse areas in State of Oregon with less than 50% of residents identifying as non-Hispanic White.

This new aquatic center will serve all North Portland residents with a culturally specific approach to reach underserved communities who have historically been excluded from public pools or felt unwelcome in these public spaces. With this proposal to establish the North Portland Aquatics Center, PP&R hopes to provide access and opportunities for young children and communities from diverse backgrounds to learn basic water survival skills and explore additional opportunities offered through an established aquatics community center. Access to these life skills is a racial equity issue. Black children in the United States drown at a rate three times higher than white children. Many factors contribute to this unacceptable public health outcome, including the accessibility of swim lessons.

The aquatic center will also provide a community anchor, and jobs through construction and later, recreation and programming— for adults and youth. It could meet wider exercise and recreation needs, provide space for affordable childcare, and host classes and camps.  An aquatic center will be critical to the health and wellbeing of North Portlanders while keeping people connected to their community.  Further, the facility could also serve as an emergency resiliency hub for situations ranging from earthquakes to extreme weather as identified by Citywide Resiliency Planning Urban Sustainability Directors Network (USDN).

The design process will build on the extensive public outreach process provided in the prior phase efforts for the North Portland Aquatic Center Project. The project will build upon community input from:

  • 30+ Stakeholder Interviews (04/2022-07/2022)
  • Summer Free For All – Free Lunch + Play Site Visits (2022)
  • 4 Total Community Events: 2(2022) & 2(2023) Community Workshops
  • 4 Community survey efforts
  • 4 Project Advisory Committee Meetings
  • 10 Focus Group Meetings with representatives from of our most vulnerable communities including BIPOC, People Living with Low Incomes, People with Disabilities, and LGBTQIA+, Immigrants & Refugees, Seniors, and Youth.

100% Renewable Goal

The project will incorporate renewable energy approaches in the design. This action will increase the City’s total energy use.  The design is targeting to increase overall City renewable energy use.

Document History

Item 634 Regular Agenda in July 26, 2023 Council Agenda

City Council

Passed to second reading

Passed to second reading August 2, 2023 at 9:30 a.m.

Item 658 Regular Agenda in August 2, 2023 Council Agenda

City Council

Passed

  • Commissioner Rene Gonzalez Yea
  • Commissioner Mingus Mapps Yea
  • Commissioner Carmen Rubio Yea
  • Commissioner Dan Ryan Absent
  • Mayor Ted Wheeler Yea

Contact

Requested Agenda Type

Regular

Date and Time Information

Requested Council Date