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191051

Emergency Ordinance

*Authorize applications to the U.S. Department of Transportation and U.S. Department of Energy for two grants to support transportation decarbonization not to exceed $5.5 million

Passed
Amended by Council

The City of Portland ordains:

Section 1. The Council finds:

  1. That, as recognized in the Climate Emergency Declaration [Resolution No. 37494], “there is a human-made climate emergency that threatens our city, our region, our state, our nation, humanity and the natural world, and that such an emergency calls for an immediate mobilization effort initiating greater action, resources, collaboration and new approaches to restore a safe climate.”
     
  2. The climate emergency is urgent, but Portland has an opportunity to act by reducing harmful greenhouse gas emissions and can make significant quality of life improvements for many Portlanders by centering the needs and priorities of Black and Indigenous communities, people experiencing low income, and community members who are more at-risk and vulnerable to the impacts of climate change.
     
  3. The Climate Emergency Workplan [Resolution 37585] includes the following actions that these grants support:
    1. Action No. T-1: Make low-carbon travel options safe, accessible, and convenient for all
       
    2. Action No. T-7: Make it easier to use electric vehicles if you can’t charge at home
       
    3. Action No. T-8: Make freight cleaner
       
  4. The Portland City Council adopted the Electric Vehicle Strategy [Resolution No. 37255] which directed PBOT staff to develop right-of-way priorities and policies to enable the installation of publicly accessible electric vehicle chargers in strategic locations and provide clear guidelines for public and private parties. PBOT staff have been working on code updates to accomplish this directive.
     
  5. As a result of the Biden Administration’s historic Bipartisan Infrastructure Law and the focus on addressing the climate crisis, $7.5 billion in federal funding has been invested in EV charging and additional funding is available to make advances on other aspects of transportation electrification and decarbonization.
     
  6. Although there is a significant increase in funding at the federal level, Portland will see limited resources allocated to local projects and face enormous competition from other jurisdictions. 
     
  7. The projects identified accelerate transportation electrification and advance citywide goals on equity. Both projects involve public-private partnerships with key local partners to help leverage resources and expertise and ensure project success:
     
    1. Park and Charge - “Park and Charge: Leveraging Utility Pole-Mounted Chargers to Increase Access to Overnight EV Charging in Portland, Oregon” provides an opportunity to develop a utility pole-mounted EV charging network focused on filling private sector gaps and providing access to affordable and reliable overnight charging to communities that lack access to home charging. Led by an innovative partnership between the City and local utilities, this project will build upon successful pilots and projects in other municipalities and will address access to and affordability of EV charging, which is an obstacle to EV ownership for renters and residents without garages or driveways.
       
    2. SMART Grant - Strengthening Mobility and Revolutionizing Transportation (SMART) Grant provides an opportunity to demonstrate novel approaches to freight electrification as identified in the 2040 Portland Freight Plan process. This grant will enable the City to build internal capacity and technology systems to digitize curb rules, better monitor curb usage, and pilot curb management strategies and innovative technologies to combat dirty diesel and make freight cleaner.
       
  8. For the Park and Charge grant, local matching funds of no less than $750,000 will be provided from private-sector partners, including but not limited to Portland General Electric and PacifiCorps.
     
  9. The SMART grant does not require match funds.

NOW, THEREFORE, The Council directs:

  1. The Mayor is hereby authorized to make application for grants in the amount of up to $5.5 million to the US Department of Energy and the US Department of Transportation.
     
  2. The Mayor is authorized to provide such information and assurances as are required for the grant period.
     
  3. The OMF Grants Office is authorized to perform all administrative matters in relation to the grant application, grant agreement or amendments, requests for reimbursement from the grantor, and to submit required online grant documents on the Commissioner-in-Charge's behalf.
     
  4. The Portland Bureau of Transportation to return to City Council no later than February 2023 with proposed code changes to enable Level 2 EV charging in the public-right-of-way, which the City Council intends to support. 

Section 2. The Council declares that an emergency exists because the grants are due immediately; therefore, this ordinance shall be in full force and effect from and after its passage by the Council.

An ordinance when passed by the Council shall be signed by the Auditor. It shall be carefully filed and preserved in the custody of the Auditor (City Charter Chapter 2 Article 1 Section 2-122)

Passed as amended by Council

Auditor of the City of Portland
Mary Hull Caballero

Impact Statement

Purpose of Proposed Legislation and Background Information

The purpose of this ordinance is to have City Council approve application for two federal grants with funding from the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law and the US Department of Energy to support transportation electrification.

Financial and Budgetary Impacts

This ordinance authorizes the City to apply for two grants funded by the US Department of Transportation and the US Department of Energy not to exceed $4 million (including local match). This funding will cover City staff time, partners, community outreach, and provide funding to help implement projects.

  • Park and Charge – funds not to exceed $1 million from the US Department of Energy to provide funding for City staff time in FY 2023-2025, partners, community outreach and project implementation to support the Climate Emergency Workplan. Matching funds of approximately $750,000 will be provided from private-sector partners, including but not limited to Portland General Electric, PacifiCorps, and other potential sources. Since we are using existing City resources as leverage, there are no impacts to our existing budget allocation.
     
  • SMART Grant – funds not to exceed $2 million from the US Department of Transportation to provide funding for City staff time in FY 2023-2025, partners, community outreach, and project costs to support early implementation of PBOT’s 2040 Freight Plan and the Climate Emergency Workplan. This federal planning grant does not require any matching funds. If awarded a planning grant this cycle, the City would be eligible to apply for an implementation grant of up to $15 million in 2023 or later.

Community Impacts and Community Involvement

Park and Charge

  • Community impacts: This project seeks to develop a utility pole-mounted EV charging network focused on filling private sector gaps and providing access to affordable and reliable overnight charging to communities that lack access to home charging. EV drivers predominantly charge their vehicles at home to maximize cost effectiveness and convenience, but renters must rely on their landlords to make upgrades or seek more expensive public charging. As state and federal rebates have helped EVs achieve price parity, access to, and affordability of charging have emerged as the main obstacles to EV ownership. This barrier disproportionately impacts black, indigenous, and people of color (BIPOC) communities in Portland as they have lower homeownership rates compared to White households. This project builds upon successful pilots and projects in other municipalities to demonstrate a model of public charging that prioritizes investments in underserved communities.
     
  • Community involvement: PBOT has been engaged in policy and code work related to EV charging in the public right-of-way for several months. As part of this process, staff have interviewed key stakeholders from utilities, private for-hire transportation, and local electrification and sustainability groups. Staff have also talked to community members and participated in the BPS EV Ready Code project where further insights into community opinions around EV charging were gained. This project advances Action T-7 (make it easier to use electric vehicles if you can’t charge at home) in the Climate Emergency Workplan [Resolution 37585], which had a robust community involvement process.

SMART Grant

  • Community impacts: This project provides an opportunity to demonstrate novel approaches to freight electrification as identified in the 2040 Portland Freight Plan. This grant will enable the City to build internal capacity and technology systems to digitize curb rules for freight and to better monitor loading zone usage. A selection of loading zones will be converted to zero-emission loading zones with EV chargers to send market signals and make freight cleaner. Some freight vehicles in the Portland area still rely on diesel, which is a source of harmful air pollutants such as particulate matter, air toxics, nitrogen oxide, and greenhouse gas emissions. Making freight cleaner will bring localized air quality benefits to many communities and will help the city achieve its greenhouse gas emission reduction goals.
     
  • Community involvement: Since 2020, PBOT has been developing the 2040 Portland Freight Plan, which will help move goods through the city while meeting goals for a safe multimodal system that supports economic prosperity, human and environmental health, equity, and resiliency. Staff have held several Community Advisory Committee Meetings and Workshops open to the public. Additionally, make freight cleaner was action item T-8 in the Climate Emergency Workplan [Resolution 37585], which had a robust community involvement process.

100% Renewable Goal

This action may increase the City’s total energy use, but it will also directly decrease harmful greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector. Additionally, while electricity use will increase from these actions, the local grid continues to become cleaner as more renewable sources are added.

Agenda Items

Passed As Amended

Motion to amend the ordinance not to exceed total funding to $5.5 million and to replace "approximately" with "no less than" in Finding 8. Moved by Hardesty and seconded by Rubio. (Y-4)
  • Commissioner Carmen Rubio Yea
  • Commissioner Dan Ryan Yea
  • Former Commissioner Jo Ann Hardesty Yea
  • Commissioner Mingus Mapps Yea
  • Mayor Ted Wheeler Absent

Contact

Kristin Hull

Principal Planner - Transportation Planning

Hannah Morrison

PBOT Planner II, Transportation Planning

Requested Agenda Type

Time Certain

Date and Time Information

Requested Council Date
Requested Start Time
9:45 am
Time Requested
30 minutes
Confirmed Time Certain