information
Storm damage recovery

Chapter 28.06 New Construction

City Code Chapter

28.06.010 Minimum Standards.

(Amended by Ordinance 181437, effective December 21, 2007.)

  1. Moorages, marinas and floating structures are to be designed and built to the minimum standards specified in the Specialty Codes except as modified by Title 28. 

28.06.020 Materials and Installations.

(Amended by Ordinances 181437, 187664 and 191154, effective March 1, 2023.)

  1. A.  Structural materials.  Structural members and connectors within 18 inches of the water, except logs used for floatation, steel stringers and steel piling, must be fabricated of materials with natural resistance to decay or be coated or treated such that the materials will resist deterioration due to their proximity to the water.  In general: framing lumber within 18 inches of the water and decking material which is exposed to the weather must be pressure treated with an approved preservative.  Framing connectors, anchoring chain, shackles and shackle pins or other anchoring devices must be hot-dipped galvanized or non-corrosive metal except for the pins that connect stringers to the floatation logs.  Plywood must have exterior type adhesive; exposed plywood must be exterior grade.  Structural members may consist of composite materials if such materials are approved by the Director.
  2. B.  Preservative treated wood must be treated using a waterborne preservative and is to be produced in accordance with the most current "Best Management Practices for Treated Wood in Aquatic Environments" issued by the Western Wood Preservers Institute and the Canadian Institute of Treated Wood.  Preservative treated wood must be identified by the quality assurance mark of an inspection accredited agency.
  3. C.  Energy Efficiency.  The exterior building envelope of the floating structure including exterior walls, floors, roofs, doors, windows, and skylights as well as the mechanical, electrical, and plumbing systems for the structure must comply with the energy efficiency requirements of the State of Oregon Building Code, as defined in Oregon Revised Statutes Section 455.010 based on the occupancy of the building. Thermal insulation which may be subject to moisture, such as main floor underfloor insulation, must be of a type approved for damp locations.
  4. D.  Ventilation.  Enclosed wood construction systems for floating structures must be ventilated in accordance with the requirements of the relevant Specialty Codes.

28.06.030 Conventional Construction Methods and Materials for Floating Structures and Walkways Using Log Support Systems.

(Amended by Ordinances 181437 and 191154, effective March 1, 2023.)

  1. A.  Floating structures.  The following methods and materials are approved without engineering provided the highest point of the roof structure measured from the top of the float does not exceed 75 percent of the minimum width of the float.
    1. 1.  The logs and stringers forming the floats under floating structure must conform to these provisions:
      1. a.  The structure on the float cannot be larger than the float.
      2. EXCEPTION: Decks raised above the level of the float deck and balconies will be permitted to project a maximum of 3 feet 0 inches beyond the edge of the float provided such projections do not affect the stability of the float as detailed in Section 28.06.040, the projections do not extend beyond the legally established boundaries of the slip in which the floating structure is located and provided the required separations between structures is not reduced by the projection.  Engineering calculations must be provided to verify that any projections beyond the edge of the float will not affect the stability of the float and structure.
      3. b.  Floats supporting combo-structures and which have a boatwell that interrupts the continuity of the float must be an engineered design or comply with prescriptive alternate methods of construction as adopted by the Director under Section 28.03.010.
      4. c.   Raft logs are to be 16-inch minimum diameter at the tip and must be spaced no greater than 18" between tangent points.
      5. d.  Bearing walls should align over stringers or center line of logs.  When such alignment is not feasible, adequate support for bearing walls must be provided.
      6. e.  If the Certified Structural Inspector or Certified Floating Structure Inspector or an architect or engineer responsible for the design of the floating structure finds the completed log raft insufficiently stable for the intended structure, they may then require the stringer layout to compose a rigid frame by the addition of side chords and fixed joints or cross bracing or by an alternate engineered design.
      7. f.  Logs must be Douglas Fir, Sugar Pine, Lodge Pole Pine, Western (Idaho) White Pine, Alaska Yellow Cedar or Sitka Spruce, sound and free of all bark above the water line.
      8. g.   In a floating structure foundation float at least 50 percent of all logs must be full length.  Segmented logs must be alternated between full-length logs.   Joints in segmented logs must be staggered a minimum of 3 stringer spaces apart laterally on alternate segmented logs.  Not more than one joint may be used per segmented log assembly. All outboard logs must be full length.
      9. h.  Logs must be notched so as to provide sufficient bearing for the stringers.  The seat of the notch must be a minimum of 4-1/2 inches above the water level when the float is fully loaded.
      10. i.  Wood stringers must be nominally a minimum of 6 inches by 10 inches for one and two story structures and be preservative treated in compliance with Subsection 28.06.020 B.  Steel stringers must be of a size to provide equivalent bearing surface and load capacity as a wood stringer used for a similar conditions and must have a minimum web thickness of 0.250 inches.
      11. j.   Stringers inside of perimeter bearing walls must be placed on the logs not more than 4 feet on center and fixed to the logs with headed steel rods a minimum of 5/8 inches in diameter and a minimum of 20 inches long.  These pins are to penetrate the log at least 10 inches.  All log to stringer contact points must have two pins.
      12. k.  The wood construction below the joists is to be inspected for proper construction and soundness of logs, including dapped bearing connections, prior to installation of joists.  Inspections must be performed by a Certified Structural Inspector, a Certified Floating Structure Inspector, a licensed architect or a licensed engineer.  The person performing the inspection must prepare a report of the inspection.  The inspection report must be submitted to the Director for review and approval prior to continuing the construction of the float.
  2. B.  Walkways leading to floating structures.  Floating walkway supports may consist of preservative treated 6 inch x 6 inch wood stringers not more than 6 feet-0 inches on center or preservative treated 4 inch x 6 inch wood stringers not more than 5 feet-0 inches on center.  Steel stringers of a size to provide equivalent bearing surface and load capacity as a wood stringer may be used for similar conditions.  Stringers must be anchored to the logs with headed steel rods (pins) as described above.  Single headed steel rods (pins) may be used at interior logs.  Maximum joist spacing is 2 feet-0 inches on center.
  3. C.  Floatation.  Floating structures must have adequate floatation to maintain a clearance above the water of 1 foot 0 inches minimum from water line to the top of the walking surface for walkways and walks and 1 foot 8 inches minimum from the water line to the finished floor level for the lowest occupied floor of all other floating structures, under all applicable load conditions.
  4. D.  Mooring connections.  Mooring connections must be adequate to keep the moorage in place under all reasonable load conditions. The following minimum connection standards are deemed to provide adequate connection to resist average load conditions.  Where a local condition imposes greater than average load conditions on a moorage, the builder must provide adequate connection to resist such loads. Such connection must be designed by an Oregon registered engineer to resist the actual loads expected.
    1. 1.  Floating structures must be anchored to the moorage structure with connections to the floatation system of the structures.  Connectors must be provided as indicated below.  These points must be a minimum of one foot from each end of the float.
      1. a.  For floats where floatation logs are parallel to the current flow connectors must be provided at each outside log and at not more than 15 feet apart at interior logs.
      2. b.  For floats where floatation logs are not parallel to the current flow connectors must be provided at each outside log and at not more than 15 feet apart at interior logs with one additional connector provided at the upstream outside log approximately midway along the length of the log.
    2. 2.  The connections must consist of a steel bracket or other approved connection.  The bracket is to be 3/8 inch thick and adequate in size to support the pins.  Pins are to be a minimum of 4 inches apart.  This bracket must be fixed with a minimum of three, headed steel rods (pins) a minimum of 5/8 inch in diameter that penetrate the floatation log at least 10 inches.  The connections from the bracket to the walkway or piling must consist of chain with a minimum link wire diameter of 1/2 inch or other approved connection device.  If attached to walkway logs, the boom chain must be looped around the second log or most secure log of the walkway.  Walkways must be adequately secured to pilings. 

28.06.040 Engineered Construction.

(Amended by Ordinances 181437 and 191154, effective March 1, 2023.)

  1. A.  General.  The minimum structural design of floating structures and moorages, except those structures conforming to the conventional construction methods and materials as listed above, must be in conformity with all applicable sections of the Specialty Codes and the requirements of this section.  The piling, mooring connectors, the gangway, and floatation system for all floating structures must have an engineer of record who is registered in Oregon. 
  2. The Engineer of Record will be responsible for establishing the design criteria and completing the design of the complete project.  The Engineer of Record must prepare and certify complete construction drawings and calculations for structural strength and floatation.  The design criteria must be substantiated by the Engineer of Record and noted on the first sheet of the construction drawings.
  3. If an engineer or architect other than the Engineer of Record has been engaged to design an element of the project such as but not limited to piles or gangways, the Engineer of Record must:
    1. 1.  Verify that the other engineer or architect has provided drawings and calculations certified by an Oregon engineer or architect.
    2. 2.  Verify that the other engineer or architect has used design criteria that have been established by the Engineer of Record.
    3. 3.   Verify the compatibility of the element's design with the design of the complete project.
    4. 4.  Verify that the designs of structural connections between the elements of the project designed by other engineers and those elements designed by the Engineer of Record have been accomplished by an engineer or architect registered in Oregon.
    5. 5.  Place review approval stamp on all drawings and calculations prepared by the other engineers showing that Subsections 1. through 4. have been accomplished.
  4. B.  Loading.  All floating structures, piling, mooring devices and gangways must be designed and constructed to sustain, within the stress limitations specified in the relevant Specialty Codes, all applicable loads specified in the relevant Specialty Codes and this Title.
    1. 1.  Current loads must be calculated on the basis of a minimum current speed of 1.5 knots unless the designer can provide documentation that the maximum current speed that can be anticipated at the location of the structure is less than 1.5 knots.  If anticipated minimum current speeds of greater than 1.5 knots can be expected at the location of the structure the higher current speed must be used for calculation of current loads.
    2. 2.   Wave and wake loads must be calculated on the basis of the maximum possible wave and/or wake that can be expected at the location of the structure.
    3. 3.  Impact loads from boats, debris and other objects must be considered with a minimum velocity as determined using a minimum current speed of 1.5 knots.  If anticipated current speeds of greater than 1.5 knots can be expected at the location of the structure the higher current speed must be used for calculation of impact loads.
    4. 4.  Earthquake loads must be considered based on values specified in the relevant Specialty Codes.
    5. 5.  Gangways not more than 6 feet wide must be designed to sustain a live load of 50 PSF unless they serve structures which contain an occupancy where more than 50 people may occupy a room at one time such as some dining establishments or meeting rooms.  Gangways more than 6 feet wide and all those serving occupancies with a calculated occupant load of 50 or more must be designed to sustain a live load of 100 PSF.
    6. EXCEPTION: Gangways not more than 6 feet wide serving public recreational boat launching and transient tie-up facilities may be designed to sustain a live load of 40 PSF.
    7. 6.  All floating structures, piling, mooring connectors, gangways and ramps must be designed and constructed to resist lateral forces produced by the reasonable combination of expected wind, current, wave, wake, earthquake and impact loads at the location.
  5. C.  Mooring connectors.
    1. 1.  Every floating structure must be moored with connectors having the capacity to hold the structure in place under reasonably expected conditions.  For engineered structures the number and locations for mooring connectors must be as specified by the design engineer.
    2. 2.  Whatever structure the mooring connectors are attached to must be designed to withstand the loads from the mooring connectors.  The engineer of record's design criteria for the project must include the maximum dimensions of the floating structure(s) as these determine the loads on the mooring connectors and their supports.
  6. D.  Piling. 
    1. 1.  Floating structures must be directly or indirectly attached to piling which is adequate to resist lateral forces produced by any normally expected combination of wind, current, wave, wake, earthquake and impact.  The minimum height of the top of the piling must be a minimum of 2 feet above the point of connection of the floating structure to the piling when the water rises to the l00 year flood elevation as shown on the Federal Insurance Rate Maps published by the Federal Emergency Management Agency.  Batter piles may not interfere with the ability of a floating structure to rise to an elevation at least 2 feet above the level of the 100 year flood elevation that is used to determine the minimum height of piling.
  7. E.   Floatation. 
    1. 1.  Floating structures must be constructed and maintained to provide a floatation system that complies with the requirements of this chapter.  The floatation devices must be structurally sound and securely attached to the framing for the superstructure, except that foam floatation blocks may be held in place by friction only. 
    2. The floatation systems must provide support adequate to provide a level and safe walking surface under all reasonable load conditions.  The following minimum standards apply to all floating structures.
    3. 2.   Clearance Above Water.  The minimum clearance above water as measured from the water line to the top of the lowest point on the floor or deck under usual dead load conditions, may not be less than 1 foot 0 inches from water line to the top of the walking surface for walkways and walks, and not less than 1 foot 8 inches from the water line to the finished floor level of the lowest occupied floor for all other floating structures.
    4. EXCEPTION:  Boathouses and the portion of combo-structures that house a personal watercraft need only have adequate floatation to maintain clearance above water under all applicable conditions. 
    5. 3.  Live Loads.  In addition to dead loads, the floatation system must be adequate to support the maximum condition of the following minimum live loads.  Higher loads may be more appropriate if the design engineer determines the need for a higher load based on the intended use conditions.
      1. a.  25 PSF applied to the gross area; or,
      2. b.  A concentrated load of 600 lbs.; or,
      3. c.  40 PSF applied to the gross, main floor area plus 10 PSF on each upper floor or loft; or,
      4. d.   For floating structures that are occupied as other than a one or two family residence, the live load required by the Specialty Code for the specific occupancy will apply.
      5. e.  Pedestrian walkways or ramps serving an occupant load of 10 or more; 40 PSF; all others 25 PSF.
      6. f.  Pedestrian walkways or structures serving boat launching or transient tie-up facilities only; 25 PSF.
      7. g.  At locations where live loads are transmitted from gangways to floating structures, the live load may be reduced 50 percent on the gangway for purposes of calculating the reaction only.  Additional floatation may have to be provided to compensate for this reaction on the floating system to maintain the prescribed clearance above water.
    6. 4. Stability with short term, off-center loading or wind loading.  The floating structure when subjected to either short-term off-center loading or wind loading may not exceed the following limitations:
      1. a.  The maximum angle of list may not exceed 4.0 degrees, or the clearance above water when measured from the water line to the top of the first floor or deck may not be less than 1/3 of the normal clearance above water, whichever is the more restrictive.
      2. b.  The ratio of resisting moment (Mr) to applied moment (Ma) must be equal or greater than unity:
      3. Mr> 1
      4. Ma        
      5. The resisting moment due to buoyancy (Mr) must be computed about a longitudinal axis passing through the center of gravity at a list angle of not more than 4.0 degrees.
      6. c.   The minimum off-center loading must be considered as applicable to the completed structure and must be considered in addition to all dead loads.  It must consist of a minimum live load of 100 pounds per lineal foot of floor length at the first floor and 50 pounds per lineal foot of floor length at each additional floor or loft.  If the width of the floor or loft exceeds 20 feet then the load must consist of 5 pounds times the width of the floor per lineal foot of floor length at the first floor and 2.5 pounds times the width of the floor per lineal foot of floor length at each additional floor or loft.  These uniform live loads are to be applied halfway between the center of gravity and the outside edges of the floors.  The overturning moments resulting from the off-center loadings (Ma) must be computed about both sides of the center axis of gravity.
      7. d.  Other appropriate eccentric or off-center loading due to wind, snow, live loads or combinations of these or other similar loads as may be determined to apply by the engineer of record, must also be considered.

28.06.050 Fire Safety.

(Amended by Ordinances 180917, 181437 and 191154, effective March 1, 2023.)

  1. A.  Fire apparatus access roads.  Access to moorages must be by fire apparatus access roads having all-weather driving surfaces capable of supporting a 23-ton load.  Such roads must be a minimum 20 feet wide with not less than 13 feet-6 inches overhead clearance.  They must be provided from the nearest public way to the head of the gangway.  Fire apparatus turnarounds will be required on any fire access road having a dead end exceeding 300 feet.
  2. B.   Moorage exits.  Two exit gangways are required whenever any one of the following conditions apply:
    1. 1.    Except as noted in item 2, if a marginal walkway exceeds 250 feet in length or if any point on the marginal walkway would be more than 250 feet from a gangway, additional gangways must be provided.  When two or more gangways are required or provided, there must be a gangway located at the extreme ends of the marginal walkway unless an alternate location is approved by the Harbor Master based on site specific conditions.
    2. 2.    Uncovered moorages for the moorage of pleasure boats (open moorage configuration) and having not more than two floating homes (for owner and caretaker, for instance) must have additional gangways if the marginal walkway exceeds 500 feet in length or if any point on the marginal walkway would be more than 500 feet from a gangway.  When two or more gangways are required or provided, there must be a gangway located at the extreme ends of the marginal walkway unless an alternate location is approved by the Harbor Master based on site specific conditions.
    3. 3.    Total distance from the nearest point of apparatus set-up (usually at the head of a gangway) to the most remote portion of the moorage exceeds 800 feet.
  3. C.   Distance Between Moorages.  A new moorage or the expansion/modification of an existing moorage may not interfere with safe fireboat access to an existing neighboring moorage.  The Harbor Master will determine minimum separations necessary to maintain fireboat access to existing moorages.
  4. D.   Distance between floating homes, tender houses, combo-structures and boathouses.
    1. 1.    Floating homes, tender houses, combo-structures and boathouses at new moorages must be spaced a minimum of 10 feet apart between the nearest exterior walls and 8 feet apart between the nearest roof, deck (which is elevated above the level of the walking surface of the float), balcony or other architectural projections.
    2. 2.    Projections such as but not necessarily limited to eaves, roof overhangs, decks, balconies or other architectural projections for newly constructed floating structures, for additions and alterations to existing floating structures and for moved or relocated floating structures may not project beyond the edge of the float supporting the structure into the area above a main or marginal walkway or extend beyond the legally established boundaries of the slip in which the floating structure is located.
    3. 3.    Separation distances may be reduced to 6 feet apart between the nearest exterior walls and 4 feet apart between the nearest roof, deck (which is elevated above the level of the walking surface of the float), balcony or other architectural projections when one of the following is provided:
      1. a.    A complete sprinkler system is installed in compliance with NFPA 13R Standards (2007) is installed in the structure(s) which create the reduce clearance conditions; or
      2. b.    Exterior walls with a fire resistance rating of one-hour with protected openings (fixed 1/4 inch wire glass in 16 gauge steel frames and 45-minute door assemblies) are to be provided at the locations where the reduced clearances occur for the new or relocated structure(s) which causes or creates the reduced clearance.
  5. E.    Distance between floating structures other than floating homes, tender houses, combo-structures and boathouses:
    1. 1.    Floating structures at new moorages that are used as other than floating homes, tender houses, combo-structures and boathouses must be spaced a minimum of 20 feet apart between the nearest exterior walls and 16 feet apart between the nearest roof, deck (which is elevated above the level of the walking surface of the float), balcony or other architectural projections.
    2. 2.    Projections such as but not necessarily limited to eaves, roof overhangs, decks, balconies or other architectural projections for newly constructed floating structures, for additions and alterations to existing floating structures and for moved or relocated floating structures may not project beyond the edge of the float supporting the structure into the area above a main or marginal walkway or extend beyond the legally established boundaries of the slip in which the floating structure is located.
    3. 3.    Separation distances may be reduced to 10 feet apart between the nearest exterior walls and 8 feet apart between the nearest roof, elevated deck, balcony or other architectural projections provided:
      1. a.    Exterior walls where reduced clearance occurs are of one hour fire resistive construction for the new or relocated structure(s) which causes or creates the reduced clearance.
      2. b.    Window openings in the exterior walls where reduced clearance occurs may not be more than 25 percent of the wall area and must be three-quarter-hour (3/4 hour) listed assemblies for the new or relocated structure(s) which causes or creates the reduced clearance.
      3. c.    Door openings on the exterior walls where reduced clearance occurs must be protected with one hour listed assemblies for the new or relocated structure(s) which causes or creates the reduced clearance.
    4. 4.    Separation distances may be reduced to 6 feet apart between the nearest exterior walls and 4 feet apart between the nearest roof, elevated deck, balcony or other architectural projections provided:
      1. a.    The building is fully sprinklered in compliance with NFPA 13 Standards (2007) including any exterior overhang or projection; and
      2. b.    Exterior walls where reduced clearance occurs are of 1-hour fire resistive construction without openings for the new or relocated structure(s) which causes or creates the reduced clearance.
  6. F.    Occupancy separation for combo-structures.  A covered boatwell, in a combo-structure, enclosed on more than two sides must be separated from the habitable space by a wall having 5/8 inch thick type ‘X' water resistant gypsum board on the boatwell side.
  7. G.  Occupancy separations for floating structures used as other than floating homes, tender houses, combo-structures and boathouses:  An occupancy separation must be provided between different occupancy groups in a floating structure used as other than floating homes, tender houses, combo-structures and boathouses when required by the Specialty Codes.  Such occupancy separations must meet the fire resistance as specified in the relevant Specialty Codes.
  8. EXCEPTION:  A covered boatwell which serves only one dwelling unit in a floating structure containing three or more dwelling units will be permitted to have a separation between the boatwell and the unit served which complies with Subsection 28.06.050 F., provided such boatwell is separated from other units in the structure as required by the Specialty Codes for unit separations.
  9. H.  Fire protection standpipe.  The following described fire protection standpipe system are required at all moorages having any portion of a floating structure more than 250 feet from the point of fire apparatus set up.  Prior to the installation of any standpipe system a permit must be obtained from the Fire Marshal.  Except as otherwise provided in Title 28 the design and installation of the standpipe system must be in accordance with the latest edition of NFPA 14:  "Installation of Standpipe and Hose Systems", as adopted in Title 31 and the following:
    1. 1.  Water for fire protection standpipes must be supplied by one of the following methods:
      1. a.  From Fire Department connection from a fire hydrant providing at least 500 GPM at 20 PSI and located within 300 feet from the closest point of fire department access to a moorage exit ramp.
      2. b.  Pumped from the Willamette or Columbia Rivers or associated bodies of water with on site pump or pumps capable of providing 250 GPM at 100 PSI to the most hydraulically remote outlet on the standpipe system.  Pumps are to be of a type approved by the Harbor Master and must be listed for their intended use.
    2. 2.  Fire protection standpipes must have a fire department connection located within 150 feet of fire apparatus set up and not more than 150 feet from the top of the moorage access ramp.  The fire department connections must be of a double clapper design.
    3. 3.  When required by the Harbor Master a fire department connection must be located to provide reasonable access for a fire boat.
    4. 4.   System capacity controlled by a fire department connection may not exceed 750 gallons unless approved by the Harbor Master.
    5. 5.  Fire protection standpipes must have pipe sized to provide 250 gallons per minute at 100 PSI pressure at the most hydraulically remote outlet on the standpipe system.  The maximum input pressure at the fire department connection must be 150 PSI.
    6. 6.  Fire protection standpipes must have adequate drain valves, or alternate systems as approved by the Harbor Master, installed to ensure complete drainage.
    7. 7.  Fire protection standpipes must have gate valve assemblies made of corrosion resistant metal, 2-1/2 inch I.D. with National Standard male threads and metal caps.  Valve assemblies must be spaced a distance apart as follows:
      1. a.  For moorages having marine service stations, floating homes or other type of structures, having permanent living quarters, valves are to be located every 100 feet and within 50 feet of the end of walkways.
      2. b.  For moorages serving only boathouses and covered moorages, valves are to be located every 150 feet and within 75 feet of the end of the walkways.
      3. c.   For moorages having only open moorage of pleasure boats, standpipes will be required along the marginal walkway with valves required at intersecting main walkways, or not more than every 200 feet and 100 feet from the end of marginal walkways.  Where main walkways extend more than 100 feet from their intersection with the marginal walkway, standpipes must be provided along the main walkways with valves located every 200 feet and not more than 100 feet from the end of the main walkway.
      4. d.   For moorages with sections of differing use, each section is required to have a standpipe of differing use, each section is required to have a standpipe system matching the requirements of a moorage having that use.
    8. 8.  Piping materials must be protected against corrosion by hot dip galvanizing or by use of HDPE piping.  If HDPE piping is used it must be installed underwater with a minimum of 12 inches of water cover over the main runs.  Adequate anchorage of HDPE piping must be provided to prevent uncharged piping from broaching the water surface.  Where flexible hose couplings are used they must have swaged on fittings.
    9. 9.  Moorages used exclusively for loading and off loading of boats and transient tie-up moorages do not require the installation of a standpipe system when approved by the Harbor Master.
    10. 10.  Standpipe systems must be inspected and tested annually in accordance with the current edition of NFPA 25, "Standards for the Testing of Water Based Fire Protection Systems" as adopted in City Title 31.  Tests and inspections must be done in a manner prescribed by the Fire Marshal, as provided.  If requested, the City may perform annual service tests upon the property owner/operator signing a waiver of liability and upon payment of a fee to the Fire Marshal, as provided in Title 31.  If connection to the City water supply is necessary to facilitate any method of testing standpipes, Water Bureau Water Quality Inspections must be contacted in each instance.  Additionally, State approved backflow protection must be provided.
  10. I.  Smoke/heat Vents and Curtain Boards.  Covered moorages must have smoke/heat vents and curtain boards installed as follows:
  11. EXCEPTION:  Smoke/heat vents and curtain boards will not be required if the Harbor Master determines that the roof configuration of the covered moorage (such as a shed roof without fascia boards) will not trap smoke and heat under the roof.
    1. 1.  Curtain Boards. Curtain boards must be installed to subdivide the enclosed roof areas of covered moorages not more than every 100 linear feet for moorages with slips of 45 feet or less in length and not more than every 75 linear feet for moorages with moorage slips of more than 45 feet in length.
      1. a.  Curtain boards must extend from eave to eave.
      2. b.   Curtain boards must be installed flush to the underside of the roof sheathing and extend down to the lowest point of the roof line, but must be maintained no lower than 8 feet above any walkway.
      3. c.  Curtain boards must be of galvanized sheet metal, water resistant gypsum board or other similar approved material that will provide equivalent performance and moisture resistance.
      4. d.  Curtain boards must be sealed to resist the passage of smoke and fire.
    2. 2.  Smoke/heat Vents.  Smoke/heat vents must be installed within each area of the roof of a covered moorage that is separated by curtain boards.
      1. a.  Smoke/heat vents must be centered between curtain boards and be installed with a minimum ratio of 1 square foot of vent opening to every 50 square feet of area under the roof.
      2. b.  Smoke/heat vents must be installed at the highest point of the roof or as approved by the Harbor Master.
      3. c.  Smoke/heat vents must be listed drop out or automatic opening assemblies with a minimum dimension of 4 feet.
    3. 3.  Smoke/heat vents and curtain boards must be shown on the permit documents issued for construction of the moorage cover.
  12. J.  Covered Moorage - Limitations on service, repair and fueling.
    1. 1.   Except at duly authorized fuel docks, fueling of boats is prohibited under Section 19.16.135.
    2. 2.   Storage of flammable or combustible liquids must comply with Section  19.16.135.
    3. 3.   Only minor service, repair or exchange of parts for maintenance of a vessel, boat or watercraft is allowed under the roof structure at a covered moorage.
      1. a.  Minor service, repair or exchange of parts includes but is not necessarily limited to the following:
        1. (1)  Changing engine/motor oil, replacing hydraulic fluids, lubrication of engine or drive train.
        2. (2)  Replacement of running gear or safety equipment that does not require alteration or modification to the structure of the craft.
        3. (3)  Repairs to the fiberglass, steel, wood or composite hull, superstructure or other structural component of a boat up to an area not to exceed 9 square feet.
        4. (4)  Painting, varnishing or similarly finishing elements such as handrails, rubrails, toeboards, etc., or minor touch up of paint, varnish or other similar finish to an area not to exceed 9 square feet.
        5. (5)  Replacement of parts of the engine or drive train that does not require the disassembly of the engine or drive train.
      2. b.   Minor service, repair or exchange of parts does not include the following:
        1. (1)  Any operation that requires hot work, including but not limited to welding and cutting.
        2. (2)  The disassembly of motors, engines or drive trains for repair or overhaul.
        3. (3)   The replacement of structural components of a boat such as framing members, engine mounts, deck supports, etc.
        4. (4)  The application of paint, varnish or other similar finish to hulls, decks, or superstructure in excess of the area specified in Subsection a. above.
        5. (5)   Repairs to the fiberglass, steel, wood or composite hull, superstructure or other structural component of a boat in excess of the area specified in Subsection a. above.
      3. c.   The Harbor Master has the authority to interpret if work being undertaken in a covered moorage is in compliance with these limitations.

28.06.055 Life Safety.

(Added by Ordinances 181437 and 191154, effective March 1, 2023.)

  1. A.  One and Two Family floating homes.  Floating homes, tender houses, combo-structures and boathouses must be constructed and maintained in compliance with the requirements of the relevant Specialty Codes, and Title 24, Title 28, and Title 29, including relevant portions of Chapter 29.30.
    1. 1. Foundation systems.  Foundation systems as specified in relevant Specialty Codes are not applicable to the construction of floating homes.  Floating Homes must be supported on floatation systems designed in accordance with provisions specified in Section 28.06.030 and Section 28.06.040.  Floating homes must be securely anchored to the float on which they are constructed using an engineered connection system designed to prevent the home from being dislodged or overturned.
    2. 2. Framing. Framing lumber must comply with the requirements of Subsection 28.06.020 A.
    3. 3. Allowable alternatives.  Recognizing the unique history and traditions associated with floating homes the following alternatives to the requirements specified in the relevant Specialty Codes are allowed without appeal:
      1. a. Exterior wall and opening protection must be as described in Section 28.06.050 based on the separation between structures in a moorage.
      2. b. Sleeping Loft.  In a floating home or combo-structure and within individual dwelling units in a floating structure containing three or more dwelling units, a sleeping loft or accessory living area such as a den, office, hobby room or similar area which is not more than 250 square feet in area that is located above the level of the main floor of a floating home may use the following standards:
        1. (1)  Access to the loft space may be by a "ship's ladder" type of stair having a rise not to exceed 12 inches and a run of not less than 6 inches or an alternating tread device as specified in the relevant Specialty Codes.  Width of stairs or alternating tread device must be a minimum of 30 inches.  Handrails must be provided at both sides of stair or alternating tread device. Headroom at stair or alternating tread device must be not less than 6 feet 6 inches at any point.
        2. (2)  A loft space need not be provided with exterior openings for natural light, ventilation or emergency escape and rescue provided the loft area is open and unobstructed to the floor below, except for columns and posts and railings not more than 42 inches high, and the floor below onto which the loft opens has exterior openings equal to the total required for the floor area served and the loft.
      3. c.   Porthole assemblies, whether new or salvaged, may be installed in a floating home to enhance the nautical character of the structure. Such assemblies need not comply with the energy conservation requirements of the specialty code provided the total area of all such assemblies installed does not constitute more than 2 percent of the total exterior wall area of the floating home.  Such assemblies may be used to meet the required area for natural light and, if openable, to satisfy the required natural ventilation.  Such assemblies may not be used to satisfy the required emergency escape and rescue requirements from sleeping areas.
    4. B.  Floating structures for use and occupancy as other than floating homes, combo-structures, boathouses or tender houses accessory to a floating home must be constructed and maintained in compliance with the requirements of the relevant Specialty Codes and Title 24, Title 28, and Title 29.
      1. 1.  Foundation systems.  Foundation systems as specified in the relevant Specialty Code are not applicable to the construction of floating structures. Floating structures must be supported on floatation systems designed in accordance with provisions specified in Section 28.06.030 and Section 28.06.040.  Floating structures must be securely anchored to the float on which they are constructed using an engineered connection system designed to prevent the structure from being dislodged or overturned.
      2. 2.  Framing.  Framing lumber must comply with the requirements of Subsection 28.06.020 A.
      3. 3.  Allowable alternatives.  Recognizing the unique history and traditions associated with floating structures the following alternatives to the requirements specified in the relevant Specialty Codes are allowed outright without appeal.
        1. a.  Exterior wall and opening protection must be as described in Section 28.06.050 based on the separation between structures in a moorage.
        2. b.  A loft, mezzanine or accessory area such as a private office, employee work room or similar area which is not more than 250 square feet in area, that is accessible to employees only and that is located above the level of the main floor of a floating structure may use the following standards:
        3. EXCEPTION:  Loft spaces within individual dwelling units in floating structures containing three or more dwelling units will be permitted to comply with the provisions of Section 28.06.055 A.3.b.
          1. (1)  Access to the loft space will be permitted to be a "ship's ladder" type of stair having a rise not to exceed 12 inches and a run of not less than 6 inches or an alternating tread device as specified in the relevant Specialty Codes.  Width of stairs or alternating tread device must be a minimum of 30 inches.  Handrails must be provided at both sides of stair or alternating tread device.  Headroom at stair or alternating tread device must be not less than 6 feet 6 inches at any point.
          2. (2)  A loft space need not be provided with exterior openings for natural light or ventilation provided the loft area is open and unobstructed to the floor below, except for columns and posts and railings not more than 42 inches high, and the floor below onto which the loft opens has exterior openings equal to the total required for the floor area served and the loft.
        4. c. Porthole assemblies, whether new or salvaged, may be installed in a floating structure to enhance the nautical character of the structure.  Such assemblies need not comply with the energy conservation requirements of the specialty code provided the total area of all such assemblies installed do not constitute more than 5 percent of the total exterior wall area of the floating structure.  Such assemblies may be used to meet the required area for natural light and, if openable, to satisfy the required natural ventilation.
    5. 4. Where the relevant Specialty Codes would require two exits be provided from a structure or occupancy within a structure, such exits must be separated as required by the Specialty Code.  The point of exit discharge for the exits must comply with the following:
      1. a. The exits must discharge directly to a main walkway at two separate locations located as far apart as is practicable; or,
      2. b. The exits must discharge to two separate fingerfloats or walks located on opposite sides of the structure.  Fingerfloats must each have direct and independent access to a main walkway.  Walks must each have direct and independent access to a fingerfloat or main walkway.  The point of exit discharge onto the walk may not be more than 50 feet travel distance from the point of access to the main walkway; or,
      3. c. The exits must discharge to a continuous walk that encircles the structure on at least three sides and which provides the capability for exiting in two directions along the walk to one of two separate and distinct locations where the walk accesses the main walkway.
      4. d. Walks need not exceed the width specified in Section 28.60.060 unless the occupant load served by the walk exceeds 150 persons.

28.06.060 Gangways, Ramps, Walkways and Walks.

(Added by Ordinances 181437 and 191154, effective March 1, 2023.)

  1. A.  All gangways, ramps, walkways, and walks serving as a means of egress for floating structures used for commercial occupancies must be illuminated by lights designed, constructed and maintained to provide a minimum average of 1 foot candle of light per square foot at the walking surface.
  2. EXCEPTION: Recreational boat launching and transient tie-up facilities.
  3. B.  Gangways and ramps must have a maximum slope of 1 vertical to 2.5 horizontal and have a non-slip walking surface or surface cleats securely fastened in place with a maximum spacing center to center of 1 foot 6 inches.
  4. C.  Gangways must have a minimum, unobstructed width of 5 feet when a single gangway is required and 4 feet when more than one gangway is required and must be provided with guardrails and handrails as required by the building code.  Intermediate landings are not required for gangways.
  5. EXCEPTION: Gangways serving an occupant load less than 10 and gangways serving recreational boat launching and transient tie-up facilities need not be more than 4 feet in width.
  6. D.  Walkways must have a minimum width 6 feet, except for fingerfloats, which may be 3 feet in width.
  7. E.  Mooring connectors and similar obstructions may project into the required width of main and marginal walkways not more than 6 inches at either side.  Cleats and bull rails may not project more than 4 inches into the required width along either side of a main or marginal walkway.  Cleats or bull rails not more than 4 inches in width may be provided along either side of a fingerfloat provided the width of the fingerfloat is of sufficient width to provide a minimum of 36 inches of clear walking surface between the cleats or bull rails.  Utility stands may project into the required width of main or marginal walkways provided they do not reduce the clear unobstructed width of the walkway to less than 4 feet for a distance of 3 feet measured in the direction of travel along the walkway.
  8. F.  A walk with a minimum width of 24 inches must be provided on at least two opposite sides of all floating homes, combo-structures, boathouses and tender house structures.  These walks must provide direct access from the floating home, combo-structure, boathouse or tender house structure to an adjacent fingerfloat or main walkway.
  9. G.  A walk with a minimum width of 36 inches must be provided on at least two opposite sides of any floating structure that is used or occupied as other than a floating home, combo-structure, boathouse or tender house structure accessory to a floating home.  These walks must provide direct access from the floating structure to an adjacent fingerfloat or main walkway.

28.06.070 Identification.

(Amended by Ordinances 181437, 183597 and 191154, effective March 1, 2023.)

  1. All moorages must be provided with identification as follows:
  2. A.  All moorages must be identifiable by name and address from the street on which they front at or near the point of emergency vehicle access.
  3. B.  The head of each gangway providing access to the moorage must be obviously identifiable from the point of emergency vehicle access; or in those cases having a secondary access road, from the shore end of the access road; or the facility must be signed as required to provide such identification.
  4. C.  The location and identification of all floating structures must be obvious from the head of each gangway by placement of a site map indicating the layout of the moorage and the walkways and which identifies each structure and/or slip individually by number or letter or combination thereof.  For the purposes of this subsection, “site map” means a plan of a moorage or marina that shows the layout of the moorage or marina including all gangways, walkways, mooring sites and land based structures and identifies the moorage by address and each moorage site/slip or land based building by number or letter or a combination thereof or by address if separate from that one of the moorage or marina.
  5. D.  The walkway, structure and mooring site identification must be logical and obvious.  Identification work is subject to the Harbor Master’s approval.
  6. E.  All floating homes, boathouses, and combo-structures must have a state issued identifying number plate displayed in a location that is readily visible from the walkway providing access to the structure.
  7. F.  Moorage owners/operators must maintain a moorage map with each mooring site identified by number or letter or combination thereof and which lists the state identifying number, if applicable, of the structure occupying each mooring site or identifies the structure occupying the mooring site by use and tenant name if no state number plate is required for the structure.  Such plan must be available for Harbor Master review when requested.