Neighborhood Profile Maps

Information
A photo taken of bicyclist and pedestrians walking across the Portland Steel Bridge.
Portland profile maps by neighborhood was created in collaboration with Portland State University Population Research Center.
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About Neighborhood Profile Maps

Civic Life is partnering with Portland State University (PSU) Population Research Center to develop data-rich neighborhood profiles.

When these are final, we believe these neighborhood profiles will:

  • Help the City and our community partners improve outreach; 
  • Set programmatic priorities unique to each neighborhood; 
  • Help Portlanders in need; and
  • Sharpen our understanding of the unique changes and issues occurring within each neighborhood.  

How we'll incorporate your feedback?

In addition to these neighborhood profiles, Civic Life is developing an interactive neighborhood profile mapping tool. We asked our partners to provide feedback on the neighborhood profiles to guide us in creating a user friendly tool. The feedback will tell us: 

  • Which data on the neighborhood profiles is most valuable/useful? 
  • How this data on the neighborhood profiles can impact future programs and events? 
  • What information needs to be clearer?

The comment period closed September 30th. PSU and Civic Life will review and incorporate comments to produce more user-friendly neighborhood profiles and an interactive map by mid-2023.   

What are neighborhood profiles? 

As you open the neighborhood profiles, you’ll find a rankings box in the upper right side. The neighborhood rankings provide comparison data across Portland’s 94 neighborhoods and 4 unclaimed areas. The neighborhood profiles also show information like: 

  • How your neighborhood has grown since 2010; 
  • What percentage of people speak a language other than English; 
  • How many of your residents are rent burdened; or 
  • How many new housing units were added to your neighborhood.   

What is the mapping tool?

There are many maps that have been developed within the City for specific programming needs. Civic Life is developing a data-rich interactive mapping tool that merges multiple data sources into one map, including the 2020 Census, the American Community Survey, Feeding America food insecurity data, CDC Social Vulnerability Index, Portlandness: A Cultural Atlas, and National Center for Health Statistics Life Expectancy Estimates. 

We hope this resource will help the City and community partners improve outreach, set programmatic priorities, help Portlanders in need and become more inclusive and equitable when making decisions about communications, programming, funding, and events. It will help to sharpen our understanding of the unique changes and issues occurring within each neighborhood.

Why are these tools unique? 

Most data, such as the U.S. Census, is aggregated by Census block. Unfortunately, Census blocks do not match neighborhood boundaries. These neighborhood profiles provide data related to each Portland neighborhood uncovering important information about our communities including race, ethnicity, languages spoken, food insecurity, income, and voting engagement. 

2020 Data

These profiles are based on 2020 Census data, the American Community Survey, Feeding America food insecurity data, CDC Social Vulnerability Index, Portlandness: A Cultural Atlas, and National Center for Health Statistics Life Expectancy Estimates. 

Below are the preliminary 2020 Profiles. Click on the profile name to view and download in PDF format.

City of Portland Profile

Neighborhood Profiles

The 94 neighborhoods are listed alphabetically, left to right.

Neighborhood District Profiles

Neighborhoods are grouped into 7 districts. Below are the neighborhood district profiles.

Communications Sent to Community

2010 Data

Data for each of Portland's 90+ neighborhoods can be found on PSU's website. Click on "explore data" tab.

Explore 2010 data

For additional questions about this work, please email CivicLife@PortlandOregon.gov