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Wildfires and Fire Danger

Hazardous materials require proper disposal

Blog post

Put the bad stuff in the right place with occasional visits to a local hazardous waste facility.

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A recent visit to the household hazardous waste facility was a reminder of all the materials that can be taken there and shouldn’t be included in your home garbage and recycling.

Batteries? Check. Propane cylinders and tanks? Check. Compact fluorescent lightbulbs? Check. Pesticides and herbicides? Check. Lighter fluid? Check. Medicines and expired drugs? Check. And so much more.

Summer cleaning of the garage, basement or shed may bring unwanted and unneeded hazardous materials into view. The Portland metro area has two hazardous waste disposal sites where residents drive up six days a week and don’t even have to get out of their car. Staff in white biological hazard suits (also known as “bunny suits”) greet you and get an understanding of what you want to dispose of at the facility. The household hazardous waste fee is $5 for up to 35 gallons, and $5 for each additional 35 gallons. Some paperwork is exchanged, and then you’re on your way.

Did you know you can take paint to over 170 paint stores for proper disposal? Oregon is part of PaintCare, a free statewide resource to recycle unwanted, leftover paint.

Oregon E-Cycles is another statewide program for unwanted electronics. Anyone can take seven or fewer computers (desktops, laptops and tablets), monitors, TVs and printers at a time to participating Oregon E-Cycles collection sites for free recycling. Computer peripherals (keyboards and mice) are also accepted free of charge.

Need more information on how to properly dispose of household hazardous waste or electronics? Ask Metro online or at 503-234-3000.