Brookside Wetland Restoration Project

Sewer and Stormwater
Active
Environmental Services is designing a project to improve water quality, lower stream temperatures, and enhance habitat for endangered salmon and other wildlife in Johnson Creek.
Construction anticipated in 2023.
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Brookside Wetland was Environmental Services’ first major flood mitigation project along Johnson Creek. The project included swales for stormwater, the addition of native plants, creation of an overflow pond to store floodwater, and a public park and wildlife-viewing area. Since completion in 1997, neighborhood stewardship and local school usage of the site as part of their natural resource  classes have been the cornerstone of this natural area.

Project Goals

  • Improve water quality and lower water temperatures in Johnson Creek.
  • Improve high-flow conditions to protect against erosion.
  • Protect and enhance habitat for endangered salmon and other wildlife.
  • Maintain parklike features; continue education and recreation opportunities; and engage with neighbors, schools, local groups, and native communities.

Project Area

A simplified map shows Brookside Wetland at the southeast corner of SE Foster Road and SE Brookside Drive. Johnson Creek flows east to west. A pond connects with the creek on the eastern edge of the wetland. A berm is located at the western edge of the pond between the pond and a channel labeled as high-flow channel. The channel connects with Johnson Creek west of the pond.

The Brookside Wetlands Project site covers 13 acres and is located along SE Foster Road near the intersection of SE 110th Avenue.

Schedule

Our condition assessment of the site is ongoing, and we are reaching out to community members, groups, and other public agencies to find ways we might work together to design solutions. Site investigations and design will continue through 2022 with construction possible in 2023.

What’s Happening Now

The existing pond was designed to reduce flooding in the area. However, during high flows, the pond fills before the peak of the flood. This limits the area’s ability to reduce flooding during larger rains.

In addition, during the last 20 years, sediment has collected on the north side of the pond and formed a natural berm that separates the pond from the creek during low-flow conditions. When this happens, the water in the pond can get too warm before it returns to the creek causing creek temperatures to rise. Warm water temperatures are bad for fish. Also, the disconnection can trap salmon in the pond without a chance to return to the creek. The current project will look at ways to solve these problems.

We Want to Hear from You

Environmental Services will inform residents and businesses about project activities and respond to questions and concerns in a timely manner. The following resources will help you stay informed and report concerns:

  • Questions: Call 503-865-4300 stating that Brookside Wetlands Project is your area of concern. Outreach staff will return your call by the next business day.
  • Sewer Emergency: In the event of a sewer backup or basement flooding, call the Maintenance hotline immediately at 503-823-1700. It is staffed all hours and all days, 24/7.

Project Background

Constructed in 1997, Brookside Wetland was Environmental Services’ first major flood mitigation project along Johnson Creek. The project included swales for stormwater, the addition of native plants, creation of an overflow pond to store floodwater to reduce flooding, and a public park and wildlife-viewing area. Since completion in 1997, neighborhood stewardship and local school usage of the site as part of their natural resource  classes have been the cornerstone of this natural area.

Since its construction, Environmental Services and our partners have completed several projects along Johnson Creek. This and other current projects along the creek build upon this past work to reduce the risk of flooding and to improve the health of Johnson Creek for a more resilient Portland.

Map shows the Johnson Creek watershed in Southeast Portland with its confluence with the Willamette River. Fish symbols label current projects (7) and completed projects (8).

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